Do You See God’s Face ?

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Where do I go to see God’s face?

Is it in the reflection from the stained glass windows of the ornate church or in the rainbow after a summer evening’s shower?

Is it in the wooden cross that hangs prominently in the front of a chapel or in the hand, blistered from creating a home for one who had none?

Is it in the podium from which magnificent sermons are preached
Or in the fulfilled faces of children who won’t go to bed hungry today for the first time in their lives?

Is it in the flickering candles in the front of the church
or in a friend’s eyes as they wipes tears from your heart?

For God is not confined by adorned walls or symbols of His glory.
He cannot be described by an ancient relic or historical artifact.
His face is in all He created.

God’s face is in the fading sunset over a wintry landscape.

God’s face is the quiet meadow as the three week old fawn nurses at her mother’s breast.

God’s face is the laughter of a little boy as he wobbles on his bicycle down the sidewalk for the first time without support.

God’s face can be found when we open our hearts to His love.

Where do I go to hear God’s voice?

Is it in the pipe organ that plays a solemn hymn or in the screams of a newborn baby as she sucks her first breath?

Is it in the words of a preacher as he pounds his fist on the pulpit or in the whisper of flapping butterfly wings as a gentle breeze carries it over the rustling grass?

Is it in the chorus of a melody that is sung on the radio or in the quiet prayers of children kneeling beside their bed before sleep?

Is it in the typed text of a worn devotional book or in the quietness of falling snow under a full moon at midnight?

For God’s voice isn’t limited to man’s simple understanding,
But the awesome power of His genius.
God’s voice is in all He gave voice to.

God’s voice is heard in the whistle of wind through the willows on a country lake sheltered from civilization.

God’s voice is heard in the clap of thunder during August storm.

God’s voice is heard in the last serenade of the crickets in the cool autumn air.

God’s voice can be heard when we still our hearts to His love.

Where do I go to feel God’s touch?

Is it in the embrace of a familiar stranger sitting next to you at church or in the soft stroke of a grandmother’s weathered finger’s on her grandchild’s cheek?

Is it the hand that distributes pamphlets proclaiming God’s wrath on a street corner or in the grasp of a toddler as he wraps his tiny hand around his father’s finger to guide his first steps?

Is it in the statues and decorations that adorn a sanctuary or in the silent reward of an unseen kind act?

Is it in the lukewarm words spoken in a time of need or in the strength of another’s shoulder when yours are too weary from life’s struggles?

For God’s touch isn’t felt in the objects or things that we fill our lives with, but in the indescribable moments when His presence is near.

God’s touch is in the painted face on a purple pansy waltzing with a gentle spring breeze.

God’s touch is in the warmth of the sun shining through a frosted window in the dead of winter.

God’s touch is felt as He guides us through the deep valley that lies in front of us.

God’s touch is felt when He wraps His unconditional loving arms
Around the child in all of us that longs to call Him Daddy.

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For more on the face of the Lord CLICK HERE 

 

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The Right Moves

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shared story

One day, many years ago, when I was working as a psychologist at a children’s institution in England, an adolescent boy showed up in the waiting room. I went out there where he was walking up and down restlessly.

I showed him into my office and pointed to the chair on the other side of my desk. It was in late autumn, and the lilac bush outside the window had shed all its leaves. “Please sit down,” I said.

David wore a black rain coat that was buttoned all the way up to his neck. His face was pale, and he stared at his feet while wringing his hands nervously. He had lost his father as an infant, and had lived together with his mother and grandfather since. But the year before David turned 13, his grandfather died and his mother was killed in a car accident. Now he was 14 and in family care.

His head teacher had referred him to me. “This boy,” he wrote, “is understandably very sad and depressed. He refuses to talk to others and I’m very worried about him. Can you help?”

I looked at David. How could I help him? There are human tragedies psychology doesn’t have the answer to, and which no words can describe. Sometimes the best thing one can do is to listen openly and sympathetically.

The first two times we met, David didn’t say a word. He sat hunched up in the chair and only looked up to look at the children’s drawings on the wall behind me. As he was about to leave after the second visit, I put my hand on his shoulder. He didn’t shrink back, but he didn’t look at me either.

“Come back next week, if you like,” I said. I hesitated a bit. Then I said, “I know it hurts.”

He came, and I suggested we play a game of chess. He nodded. After that we played chess every Wednesday afternoon – in complete silence and without making any eye contact. It’s not easy to cheat in chess, but I admit that I made sure David won once or twice.

Usually, he arrived earlier than agreed, took the chessboard and pieces from the shelf and began setting them up before I even got a chance to sit down. It seemed as if he enjoyed my company. But why did he never look at me?

“Perhaps he simply needs someone to share his pain with,” I thought. “Perhaps he senses that I respect his suffering.” One afternoon in late winter, David took off his rain coat and put it on the back of the chair. While he was setting up the chess pieces, his face seemed more alive and his motions more lively.

Some months later, when the lilacs blossomed outside, I sat starring at David’s head, while he was bent over the chessboard. I thought about how little we know about therapy – about the mysterious process associated with healing. Suddenly, he looked up at me.

“It’s your turn,” he said.

After that day, David started talking. He got friends in school and joined a bicycle club. He wrote to me a few times (“I’m biking with some friends and I feel great”); letters about how he would try to get into university. After some time, the letters stopped. Now he had really started to live his own life.

Maybe I gave David something. At least I learned a lot from him. I learned how time makes it possible to overcome what seems to be an insuperable pain. I learned to be there for people who need me. And David showed me how one – without any words – can reach out to another person. All it takes is a hug, a shoulder to cry on, a friendly touch, a sympathetic nature – and an ear that listens.

Many of us suffer with pain and have forgiven and forgotten; moving on we join back with the living and share our weapons that have given us victory to others in our life. That’s what we do. We encourage others to be strong, give them a reason (as we found) to keep going. I’m not saying that we should take up chess, but let this inspire you to use what you know; Who you know, and what you do to uplift others or just be a caring soul in the midst of their fiery trial encouraging them in the right Way that leads to overcoming adversity. Earth has become an even worse place to grow up. But don’t despair; trials are but for a moment.

2 Cor 4:17-18 “For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory; While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.”

Jn 16:33 “These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.”

1 Jn 5:4 “For whatsoever is born of God overcometh the world: and this is the victory that overcometh the world, even our faith.”

1 Peter 4:12-13 “Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you: But rejoice, inasmuch as ye are partakers of Christ’s sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy.”