Moral Courage: It’s Value

Courage is a highly admired virtue. Most often we associate the word with physical prowess or bravery. But there’s another form of valor that’s much more important because it comes up more often. It’s called moral courage – the willingness to face not physical danger but emotional pain, disapproval, financial insecurity, or uncertainty rather than compromise an ethical principle.

Moral courage is essential not only for a virtuous life, but a happy one. Without courage, we have no control over our lives. Our fears corrode our spirit and confine us like a barbed wire fence. That’s why they say a coward dies a thousand deaths, a brave man but one.

Integrity is essential to self-esteem and the admiration of others. It requires us to put our comforts, possessions, friendships, and even jobs at risk in the defense of deeply held principles.

It takes moral fortitude to be honest at the risk of ridicule, rejection, or retaliation or when doing so may jeopardize our income or career. It takes boldness to be accountable and own up to mistakes when doing so may get us in trouble. It takes backbone to stand tough with our kids when doing so may cost us their affection.

Mark Twain said, ‘Courage is not the absence of fear but the resistance of fear, the mastery of fear.’ To paraphrase President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the enemy is not what we fear; it is fear itself. If our insecurities and anxieties cause us to lose confidence in the power of virtue, we will lose something very precious.

People with moral courage rarely get medals, but it is the best marker of true character and a virtue others can be proud of.

BONUS VIDS I LIKED; SHARE EM’ ! I DID ….

The Jungle Bed

Smoke free tepee?! How to dig an air tunnel underneath!

My Thanks and support to Corporal Kelly@ Corporal’s Corner and Lilly@ SurvivalLilly

Growing Good Corn

James Bender, in his book How to Talk Well (published in 1994 by McGraw-Hill Book Company Inc.) relates the story of a farmer who grew award-winning corn. Each year he entered his corn in the state fair where it won a blue ribbon.

One year a newspaper reporter interviewed him and learned something interesting about how he grew it. The reporter discovered that the farmer shared his seed corn with his neighbors.

‘How can you afford to share your best seed corn with your neighbors when they are entering corn in competition with yours each year?’ the reporter asked.

‘Why sir,’ said the farmer, ‘didn’t you know? The wind picks up pollen from the ripening corn and swirls it from field to field. If my neighbors grow inferior corn, cross-pollination will steadily degrade the quality of my corn. If I am to grow good corn, I must help my neighbors grow good corn.’

He is very much aware of the connectedness of life. His corn cannot improve unless his neighbor’s corn also improves.

So it is in other dimensions of our lives.

Those who choose to be at peace, must help their neighbors to be at peace.

Those who choose to live well must help others to live well, for the value of a life is measured by the lives it touches.

And those who choose to be happy must help others to find happiness, for the welfare of each is bound up with the welfare of all.

The lesson for each of us is this . . . if we are to grow good corn, we must help our neighbors grow good corn.

BONUS VIDEO

Building A Primitive Shelter With Modern Tools (Part 1)

Thanks to Survival Lilly for this video. Good show Lilly!

 

Gifts From the Heart

According to legend, a young man while roaming the desert came across a spring of delicious crystal-clear water. The water was so sweet he filled his leather canteen so he could bring some back to a tribal elder who had been his teacher.

After a four-day journey he presented the water to the old man who took a deep drink, smiled warmly and thanked his student lavishly for the sweet water. The young man returned to his village with a happy heart.

Later, the teacher let another student taste the water. He spat it out, saying it was awful. It apparently had become stale because of the old leather container. The student challenged his teacher: ‘Master, the water was foul. Why did you pretend to like it?’

The teacher replied, ‘You only tasted the water. I tasted the gift. The water was simply the container for an act of loving-kindness and nothing could be sweeter. Heartfelt gifts deserve the return gift of gratitude.’

I think we understand this lesson best when we receive innocent gifts of love from young children. Whether it’s a ceramic tray or a macaroni bracelet, the natural and proper response is appreciation and expressed thankfulness because we love the idea within the gift.

Gratitude doesn’t always come naturally. Unfortunately, most children and many adults value only the thing given rather than the feeling embodied in it.

We should remind ourselves and teach our children about the beauty and purity of feelings and expressions of gratitude. After all, gifts from the heart are really gifts of the heart.

BONUS VIDEO BELOW

Survival Kit For Your Home

Super thanks to Survival Lilly for this video! Thanks Lilly

Plants and People

Plants grow best when we pay attention to them. That means watering, touching them, putting them in places where they will receive good light. They need people around them to notice if they are drooping at the edges or looking particularly happy in the sunlight. The more attention a plant receives, the better it will grow.

We need to be noticed in the same way. If we notice a family member or friend is drooping, perhaps we can pay some special attention to him or her. All of us need someone to care about how we are and to truly listen to us.

We can share and double someone’s happiness by noticing and talking about it also. We help the people around us to grow by listening to their droopy edges as well as their bright days.

People need this as much as plants need light and water.

Lk 6:28 “Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you.” (KJV)

BONUS VIDEO

7+3 Ways Of Fire-making And How To Improve Them

My Thanks and support to Survival Lilly @ Youtube. Thanks Lilly!

 

Daddy’s Poem

Her hair was up in a pony tail, her favorite dress tied with a bow.

Today was Daddy’s Day at school, and she couldn’t wait to go.

But her mommy tried to tell her, that she probably should stay home.

Why the kids might not understand, if she went to school alone

But she was not afraid; she knew just what to say.
What to tell her classmates of why he wasn’t there today.

But still her mother worried, for her to face this day alone.
And that was why once again, she tried to keep her daughter home.

But the little girl went to school eager to tell them all.
About a dad she never sees a dad who never calls.

There were daddies along the wall in back, for everyone to meet.

Children squirming impatiently, anxious in their seats.

One by one the teacher called a student from the class.
To introduce their daddy, as seconds slowly passed.

At last the teacher called her name, every child turned to stare.

Each of them was searching, for a man who wasn’t there.

‘Where’s her Daddy at?’ she heard a boy call out.
‘She probably doesn’t have one,’ another student dared to shout.

And from somewhere near the back, she heard a daddy say,
‘Looks like another deadbeat dad, too busy to waste his day.’

The words did not offend her, as she smiled up at her Mom.
And looked back at her teacher, who told her to go on.

And with hands behind her back, slowly she began to speak.
And out from the mouth of a child, came words incredibly unique.

‘My Daddy couldn’t be here, because he lives so far away.
But I know he wishes he could be, since this is such a special day.

And though you cannot meet him, I wanted you to know.
All about my daddy, and how much he loves me so.

He loved to tell me stories, he taught me to ride my bike.
He surprised me with pink roses, and taught me to fly a kite.

We used to share fudge sundaes, and ice cream in a cone.
And though you cannot see him, I’m not standing here alone.

Cause my daddy’s always with me, even though we are apart
I know because he told me, he’ll forever be in my heart.’

With that, her little hand reached up, and lay across her chest.
Feeling her own heartbeat, beneath her favorite dress.

And from somewhere here in the crowd of dads, her mother stood in tears.

Proudly watching her daughter, who was wise beyond her years.

For she stood up for the love of a man not in her life.
Doing what was best for her, doing what was right.

And when she dropped her hand back down, staring straight into the crowd.

She finished with a voice so soft, but its message clear and loud.

‘I love my daddy very much, he’s my shining star.
And if he could, he’d be here, but heaven’s just too far.

You see he was a policeman and died just this past year
When airplanes hit the towers and taught Americans to fear.

But sometimes when I close my eyes, it’s like he never went away.’

And then she closed her eyes, and saw him there that day.

And to her mothers amazement, she witnessed with surprise.
A room full of daddies and children, all starting to close their eyes.

Who knows what they saw before them, who knows what they felt inside.

Perhaps for merely a second, they saw him at her side.

‘I know you’re with me Daddy,’ to the silence she called out.
And what happened next made believers, of those once filled with doubt.

Not one in that room could explain it, for each of their eyes had been closed.

But there on the desk beside her, was a fragrant long-stemmed pink rose.

And a child was blessed, if only for a moment, by the love of her shining star.

And given the gift of believing, that heaven is never too far.

 

Credit: Cheryl C-F.

BONUS VIDEO!

If you have about 45 minutes and you love children, then this video will bless and inform you-it’s real truth, and it’s very ugly.

Thanks to Dave Hodges for his interview here!

Original story and video found here:

Breaking-Many Elite Headed to Prison for Child Sex Trafficking-Liz Crokin on the CSS (LINK)

Mt 18:6 “But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea.

Mt 18:7 “Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh!

Revolutionizing Civilization

I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical.” – Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, Paris, January 30, 1787

Is there time for this and what would it look like?

There is a flow to history. In school, we’d study the French Revolution for a while and then have a test on it and then we’d switch gears and learn about World War I. It turns out, however it’s possible to trace events from one that led to the other.

The unlikely happens regularly. Very often things happen which seem highly unlikely in their context. The Russian Revolution comes to mind, but there are plenty of examples.

Lenin ending up in power seemed like the least likely outcome. But it turns out if you let things get too far out of hand then you never know who will come to power. Keep in mind, the only Democracy stays behind closed doors and the people are only led to believe their vote counted towards a new leader, etc. All leaders are pre-appointed and charade ensues where opponents play the role; and with the help from the state-owned media, it comes off with success. But the acting does not stop at inauguration.

Anyway, it’s important for us today to realize that over time, people slowly lose faith in governments, corporations, neighbors, etc… desperation is growing and extreme outcomes are becoming more likely. People don’t know who to trust so many end up trusting the most manipulative and least trustworthy individuals. Forward progress may soon no longer be the most likely outcome.

Very little has changed. Popular understanding of history makes a big deal of the revolutions: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Protestant Revolution, the Russian Revolution, etc. We are told they are major turning points in human evolution and progress. But when you look at fundamental concepts of how rulers and the ruled behave and interact you see very little real difference.

The privileges, power and sense of entitlement of the old landed elite are little different from the privileges, power and sense of entitlement of today’s wealthy elite. Landed aristocrats enjoyed power and extra income (without work) controlling land while today’s capitalists (elites behind the scenes) enjoy power and extra income (without work) controlling money. Because they own the land/wealth they feel they are entitled to make decisions about how people use resources (if at all) and what opportunities we as individuals have.

After the Russian Revolution, it was a sort of bureaucratic elite that enjoyed the position and privilege. Never have we seen a political and economic system where the people are in charge not even in the United States. We’ve only seen different flavors of the same brand of “civilization” with elite rule for the elite (PTB).

Are other brands possible? Is government of, for and by the people possible? Is an economic system that rewards hard work, makes use of all our human potential (helps people realize their potential without pretense or pretend) and leaves room for individual expression and freedom possible? Is the fact that we’ve never had proof that it is impossible or does it offer promise that if we only could think of a new way (or back to an old way not expounded on) to organize and manage civilization then anything would become possible?

People are amazing. Many have lost their way and done it easily. Our political and economic systems push many down paths of unspeakable inhumanity.

But despite our systems there is a persistent ever small thread of kindness, innovation and “humanity” lying under the surface.

When we find ourselves in the right conditions we can reason our way through incredibly difficult and abstract questions. It gives me hope that one day we can overcome the power the world’s systems have over us and discover new ways (or go back to the old tech of the day) to live and work with each other that truly revolutionizes civilization.

Until we do we are condemned to repeat history so the lessons you learn from history will tell you the future.

Rome will fall again, and the Middle Ages are coming back.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan, truly spoken and sincere

B O N U S!

DIY Alcohol Stove With a Dollar Store Water Bottle

ALCOHOL BURNING STOVE

 

History or a Continuing of Stupidity?

When it comes to ‘ the lessons of history ‘ there are doubtless many things we could aspire to learn.

Some of those would be more practically useful, in terms of contributing to the normal and decent functioning of well-meaning societies than others.

Here, we’ll share some quotes showing how some observers express disillusionment about Humanity’s all-too-frequent failure to learn worthwhile lessons from history!

Other quotations show an appreciation that deeply important lessons about Human Existence can be learnt from the study of History.

Our overview of the possible lessons of history may not so much explicitly focus importance on the broader range of past mistakes of history, of which there are many, as learning useful lessons about – The Human Condition AND Social Change.

This can show, through cautionary examples, how past mistakes have arisen from time to time disrupting the normal and decent functioning of would-be well-meaning societies.

We spend a great deal of time studying history, which, let’s face it, is mostly the history of stupidity.” -Stephen Hawking

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.” -Aldous Huxley

If men could learn from history, what lessons it might teach us! But passion and party blind our eyes, and the light which experience gives us is a lantern on the stern which shines only on the waves behind.” -Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Rulers, Statesmen, Nations, are wont to be emphatically commended to the teaching which experience offers in history. But what experience and history teach is this – that people and governments never have learned anything from history, or acted on principles deduced from it. Each period is involved in such peculiar circumstances, exhibits a condition of things so strictly idiosyncratic, that its conduct must be regulated by considerations connected with itself, and itself alone.” -G. W. F. Hegel

History repeats itself because no one was listening the first time.” -Anonymous

Human nature will not change. In any future great national trial, compared with the men of this, we shall have as weak and as strong, as silly and as wise, as bad and as good. Let us therefore study the incidents in this as philosophy to learn wisdom from and none of them as wrongs to be avenged.” -Abraham Lincoln (in the context of The American Civil War of 1861 to 1865)

History is for human self-knowledge … the only clue to what man can do is what man has done. The value of history, then, is that it teaches us what man has done and thus what man is.” -R. G. Collingwood

What man is, only history tells.” -George Mosse

Mankind are so much the same, in all times and places, that history informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular. Its chief use is only to discover the constant and universal principles of human nature.” -David Hume

Credit: Derek P.

Awesome quotes! Thanks Derek for your input!!