‘YOU STILL OWE US $1,400’: WOMAN DEPENDENT ON OXYGEN TANK DIES AFTER PROVIDER CUTS OFF ELECTRICITY (LINK)

What if this was your relative?????????

New Jersey always seems to be the purveyor of bad news all the time…what a grand ol’ state to live in…:| Lot of good positive compassion there…gota visit eh???

Excerpt:

New Jersey authorities are investigating the circumstances of the tragic death of an elderly woman who was reliant on an oxygen tank and suffered heart failure after her electricity provider cut off the power supply to her home…………”

Get the sad story here at link below:

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/you-still-owe-us-1400-woman-dependent-on-oxygen-tank-dies-after-provider-cuts-off-electricity_072018

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Will Our Lack of Humanity Be the END of Humanity? (LINK)

“………It seems that I can publish the most heart-wrenching thing and if it doesn’t fall in line with somebody’s political opinion, they can turn it around and say something that makes me doubt they even have a soul……..” -Daisy Luther [Read more from Daisy at link below]

Thanks Daisy!! 🙂

Will Our Lack of Humanity Be the END of Humanity?

https://www.theorganicprepper.com/end-humanity/

I’ve seen the same thing. Thanks Daisy for expressing your feelings in this awesome tell-tale article. I believe (albeit very few) that there are still a few people that have souls left; that somehow they still have a natural compassion for the weaker more needy person. I hope that we have not dissed humans in favor of say, “trees, plants and animals;” while these are blessed in their own created right, they are not made in the image of God such as we are and we have hearts and emotions that can be expressed and even understood. No plant, vegetable or mineral can do that. As for animals, yes, they have souls I believe, but for the greater of humanity, I recommend we put people over animals always! Without us, they’rd be no them…at least happy ones. If there were no humans to be guardians, they’d be awful lonely“. -Moraldiplomat

About Daisy:

$8 Homemade Air Conditioner – Works Flawlessly! (VIDEO)

This is pretty “cool.” But, remember, the air flow must spend time in, on and around the ice, frozen jugs or frozen “whatever” to be affective. Might take longer but may want to try it on low speed for the fan, thereby allowing more contact with the cold items. Just saying, but this does work. It’s not a monster window unit AC,  but if your hot, sitting in front of this is a tad better than sitting in front of a regular fan circulating the hot air around you, blowing in your face-   For the price, you can’t beat the effects. Experiment and see if you or the kids can make it cooler!! Cool project. See what you can come up with eh?

$8 Homemade Air Conditioner – Works Flawlessly!

Thanks to Household Hacker for the video!

Tea, I Mean, Pesticide Anyone? (LINK)

Ya know, when we think of vegetable and fruits, we can pretty much assume there are (even on organics) some type of pesticide chemical on them (that’s why we wash them a certain way). But, when drinking tea, hot or cold, we really don’t consider that they too, will be sprayed with insecticide. This article is revealing. I live in the South (USA) and I come from a long line of tea (sweet tea) drinkers. No wonder we grew up with all sorts of issues, and plentiful trips to the doctors….”bad tea!” Enjoy the link.

These Popular Tea Brands Possess Dangerously High Levels of Pesticides!

http://www.unseen-pedia.com/these-popular-tea-brands-possess-dangerously-high-levels-of-pesticides/

The Fire Drill

*Still in the Sherwood Forest……?

January in Sherwood Forest was known as ‘Wolf-Month’ for a very good reason; wolf packs driven by snow or cold to shelter in the woodlands in the same way as the outlaws would become a serious threat; the wolves natural food was scarce at that time and starving animals were known to overcome their natural fear of man and enter nearby villages in an attempt to carry off livestock and on more than a few occasions even small children – grown men and horses passing through Sherwood in the medieval period are recorded as having been attacked by wolves, a wintertime hazard that remained until the 14th Century.

In one medieval example, a wolf leaped out on a horse and rider, bit off a piece of horse-rump and fled into the forest with the reeking piece of flesh before the rider realized what had happened. A small child was carried off from Linby by a wolf in the early 12th Century.

Even an armed man on foot would become a hunted quarry and possibly have to face a desperate and terrifying foe suited to the environment and equipped with deadly weapons designed for face-to-face close-combat.

A wonderful morale-booster, fires frighten animals and give off warmth and light and you can then heat your water and cook your food using it, adding a civilized aspect to living rather than just simply surviving outdoors and is what makes most folk today remember as a comfortable camp under canvas or the stars from a past outdoor experience.

Fire can be made using natural materials and is not as hard to create this way as you think if you simply have a go and practice; an everyday task which would be as natural and easy to a medieval person as tying shoelaces or switching on an electric light would be to a modern city-dweller.

Medieval people often carried flint and steel but could also recognize the correct materials for ‘making fire by rubbing two sticks together’ at a glance. This method generally falls into two categories – the fire plough or the fire drill.

Credit: Jonathan C.

P.S. We have many survival advantages Robin Hood and his Merry Men did not have. They lived before matches and other modern fire starters.

Fortunately, we live in an age when we can start a fire whenever and wherever we want.(VIDEO LINK)

VIDEO LESSON

Fresh Bow Drill (Poplar on Hazel)

*Thanks to Survival Lilly for the vid; Good job Lilly!
Watch, Like, Subscribe to Survival Lilly

 

Some More Lessons To Learn

…albeit the hard way.

In a struggle where more than 650,000 men perished over a period of a mere four years, on a fascinating stage where the last vestiges of feudalism clashed with the industrial revolution and modern representative democracy, there are bound to be lessons.

Latest estimates put the tally at around 800,000 deaths caused by the war. A staggering figure given that the US at the time -1860- had only around 31 million inhabitants all together. Percentage wise this is more than France or Germany lost during the First World War.

If so many people were willing to risk their lives in the most destructive of circumstances, for reasons which are not always clear to us today, this war must have seen some fierce characters. Some rose to the occasion and others faltered miserably.

What are some lessons we can derive from these examples?

First, we’ve learned a true leader takes the blame. One of the most inspirational leaders of the American Civil War was no doubt Robert E. Lee. He won a string of victories against opponents that often outnumbered him by two to one and had superior weaponry and logistics. He was not the most brilliant strategist however and his victories were costly. His management of the war’s biggest and most famous battle, Gettysburg, was very poor and based on deep feelings of contempt for the fighting qualities of his enemy; either that or there was some unified agreed upon collusion with the enemy.

When Lee’s last attempt to win the battle -a grand charge over an open field where his men would be exposed to unlimited fire from well-positioned, long-range Union artillery- was bloodily repulsed, he immediately took all the blame; and justly so.

From the approximately 15,000 men that were assigned to make the charge, about half were lost.

He did not make the best decisions during this battle, but it’s equally true several of his key subordinates made vital mistakes as well. Instead of putting all the blame on them, he took full responsibility for the bloody defeat; again, justly so.

This act held the army together for whatever reason, it had a paradoxical effect of maintaining the confidence of the soldiers had in him, and it inspired the army to fight another day.

Anyway, remember, if you go around blaming other people for what went wrong, they will subconsciously realize you are not really in charge and your authority will suffer. If you want to be a leader, take full responsibility for whatever happens to your cause, army, company, business, community…

Another lesson we can draw is that you decide when you are defeated.

Early in the war general Nathan Bedford Forrest and his men were being -sort of- besieged in Fort Donelson, together with about 14,000 other soldiers. His commanders quickly lost all hope, ignoring opportunities to break out and defeat their enemy. Instead they started bickering over who should take care of the details of their surrender.

Nathan Bedford Forrest understood the situation better than his superiors and took matters into his own hands. He decided to at least keep his own little command out of the enemy’s prisons. He told his men: “Boys, these people are talking about surrendering, and I am going out of this place before they do or bust hell wide open.” He took 700 men and somehow managed to slip them past the enemy’s lines, something his demoralized superiors weren’t even willing to consider. Live today, fight tomorrow scenario.

The lesson: you’re not defeated until you give up looking for opportunities to turn the tide.

Credit mostly: Frank M.

*Thanks Frank!

BONUS VIDEO- CHECK IT OUT!

SHTF Bug Out Bag (Cold Environment)

Thanks to Survival Lilly @ YOUTUBE

Outlaws

Once more on Robin Hood and the survival lessons we can learn from the legends of the Merry Men in the Sherwood Forest.

Realistically, surviving a typical medieval winter in Sherwood Forest might not have been much fun as an outlaw.

If a band of medieval outlaws in Sherwood Forest managed to survive the everyday threat of being captured or killed by the forces of (crooked) law and (dis) order, their next biggest worry would be simply how to stay alive in terms of shelter and finding something to eat and drink as medieval temperatures dropped far below the winters we experience today.

The outlaws would be by necessity nomadic, moving around within an established area unsettled in terms of any permanent storage capacity and so be unable to plant and nurture any crops or vegetables.

Staying in one place for too long risked detection by the authorities. In summertime a band of men could survive by eating as hunter-gatherers like their ancestors but with the approach of autumn and as the temperature began to drop other measures would clearly have to be adopted.

To physically exist a man requires food and drink – in cold weather he would also require a suitable shelter and a source of heat.

An outlaw band planning to stay in Sherwood Forest through the winter would have to have the means to provide themselves with all four.

The problem with not having made proper provision for winter is obvious; you will meet a cold, lonely and hungry death.

Sleeping in the open after a day spent in the open is risking hypothermia and exposure, and simply freezing to death in your sleep.

Any shortages of drink and food would result in a quicker fall in energy in the short-term and in the long-term the body’s natural resistance to cold and sickness and in both the brain’s ability to reason; death could be measured in hours. But without sleep, the body cannot function naturally.

Many people are surprised when they hear that hypothermia can occur anywhere and anytime when the air temperature is below 60F /16C the body needs to maintain a core of warmth and as the core temperature drops heat is taken from the head, resulting in a drop in circulation and energy being burned to provide heat rather than to feed the brain; the brain slows down, irrational behavior gradually grows until the subject doesn’t know what they are doing.

The effect is so gradual the subject will not realize it is happening without immediate help, they will die. A slight breeze can half the time a man could expect to be in trouble through hypothermia; a cool wind can reduce it by four times that. Our outlaws would quickly have to learn two things; to stay dry and to keep out of the wind.

In prolonged daytime temperatures of below freezing, living permanently outdoors is very risky unless you know what you are about; after dark in the same conditions, you sleep with the risk that you might never wake up again.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan for all your contributions!

Cold Water Challenge – The Selection on HISTORY – How I Survived Hypothermia

*Thanks to Survival Lilly for all her informative videos – Subscribe and support Lilly!!! 🙂