Common Knowledge

Electronics. Freeze Drying. Material Sciences. Today’s modern-day technologies have made being prepared for short-term and long-term survival easier than ever. Unfortunately, electronics need a constant energy source, freeze dried food is not always on hand, and lightweight materials eventually wear out.

Note: In the event of and EMP (Electro-magnetic pulse) due to a localized nuke, and or a created pulse – your electronic phone, lap top, PC, etc will not work AT ALL. Alternate means of survival and communications are preferred.’

Though today’s sciences have made survival easier, it would behoove us all to keep in mind the survival skills learned and implemented by our forefathers.

A group of resilient individuals who were skilled at surviving the harsh elements with little rations and supplies were the men who fought during the American Civil War: both Union and Confederate.

During this time, a world run on electricity was left to the realm of science fiction. The men on the front lines during the various battles had not computers, GPS, or digital anything. It was an analog world. Even though this sounds archaic in today’s hi-tech world, the durability of a brass and clockwork world has extended to modern times; whereas, many electronics do not last longer than a few years.

Learning to use an analog compass could be one of the most important skills you could acquire.

Additionally, an analog watch would be another common tool that our forefathers carried. The most common style was of course a pocket watch, but a wristwatch works just fine. What is important is the fact the watch is a wind up and does not rely on batteries to operate. There are many wind up watches from the Civil War era that are still in use today. All you do is remember to wind it up every day and you are set.

Tools should not be the only focus when looking for survival tips from the past. Food is another important aspect of survival and again we can look to the rations of the Civil War soldier for ideas. The Confederates and the Federals had very similar diets in the beginning, which consisted primarily of salted pork and dry goods such as beans and rice.

Two main staples of a soldier’s diet were hardtack and desiccated potatoes. Hardtack is a type of hard, dry biscuit made from flour, salt, and water. The ingredients are mixed together and slowly baked until hard. The shelf life of these little briquettes was remarkable so long as they were kept dry.

It was even rumored the U.S. issued hardtack made during the Civil War to soldiers fighting in the Spanish American War.

Another food item soldiers were issued were desiccated potatoes. Once again, the starch laden food was relatively cheap to come by and seemed to have kept the men feeling full. Desiccated is simply another word for dehydrated for all intents and purposes. The potatoes were thinly sliced and dried until all the moisture was removed and the slices were no longer pliable. Like hardtack, desiccated potatoes have an incredible shelf life.

When it came time to eat both, they were commonly boiled in broth or in water with salt pork until the potatoes or the biscuit became tender.

It is common knowledge the most versatile modern-day material is the polyethylene tarp. These tarps can be used as a shelter, water collector, ground cover, or rain fly. Just has the polyethylene has a variety of uses so does its ancestor, the canvas tarp.

The canvas tarp can be used for everything a polyethylene tarp, plus a few extras. Canvas tarps are better suited than polyethylene to fashion replacement packs or totes to carry supplies.

Canvas tarps are also better for being turned into ponchos, jackets, and other clothing items. During the Civil War, it was common to draw field maps on canvas instead of paper because of its water resistance and durability.

There is no doubt modern technology has made survival and emergency preparedness much easier. However, this does not mean should not look to the past for tips and techniques for successful survival.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Thanks Frank!!

Top 10 Survival Tips

Basic Survival Skills (LINK)

Are You Lost?

*Survival Tip

Why is it some of us seem to know instinctively where to go and others wander around without a clue? Some researchers believe the answer lies deep within the brain, embodied by an actual “sense” of direction that can be resurrected and trained.

For instance, in 1981, R. Robin Baker, Ph.D., a biologist at the University of Manchester, England, reported that blindfolded subjects, when transported to a distant site, could indicate the direction home. Based on his studies, Baker theorized that humans possess a magnetic navigation system that works similarly to the way some birds and fish use Earth’s magnetic fields to find their way during migration, a feat known as magnetoreception.

Although other biologists have been unable to duplicate Baker’s results, it’s undeniable that some people have extraordinary abilities to find their way.

In animals, much of the directional mechanism is inherited, but a lot of it is learned. We humans are likely born with this innate sense of direction, and then either develop it as we get older or lose it from lack of use.

To improve your sense of direction, you need to get out and test it from time to time. No matter how prone you are to get lost, you don’t have to go through life with a GPS in your hand. And what happens when the grid goes down? It will one day you know?

Strategies to help you find your way. It’s best to start out on your home turf.

Study the topography maps of your home town to get the lay of the land. Concentrate on imagining what the valleys, streams, and mountains will look like in relation to one another, and store these images in your memory.

Allow plenty of rest time before and during trips. Studies show the brain is more adept at receiving and storing spatial relationships when well rested.

Practice learning where north, south, east, and west are in relation to your surroundings.

Learn constellations, particularly the North Star, so you can locate true north no matter where you are. It won’t necessarily help you hone an internal sense of direction, but it may help you keep your bearings.

Remember, we’re all in this together,

Credit: Derek P.

Thanks Derek!

RELATED > Escaping A City During SHTF  

 

Don’t Get Lost Anymore

Human spatial memory is outstanding. In Ancient Greece, orators visualized their speeches as a mansion, placing topics in each room, then retrieving them while taking an imagined route through the building. Memory champions still do the same.

But navigation is a ‘use-it-or-lose-it’ skill. Drivers in a simulator who follow satellite-navigation instructions find it more difficult to work out where they have been than those who use maps. Instructed drivers also fail to notice they have been led past the same point twice. Mountain-rescue teams are tired of searching for people with drained smartphone batteries, no sense of direction and no paper map.

As we get older, people’s spatial knowledge and their capabilities for route learning and recall seem to decline in some. Loss of spatial orientation is an early indicator of dementia as its been stated. Those who are affected are often moved to unfamiliar places such as care homes, which can exacerbate disorientation. The minimalist interiors of hospitals lack signposts: in a 2015 study, nearly half of junior doctors reported that they had gotten lost in hospitals on the way to a call in which a patient’s life was in danger.

The solution might lie in designing buildings that are easy to navigate — rather than in gadgets. Repeated and mirrored layouts cause confusion; cluttered corridors overload the mind. Placement of simple, memorable and unique landmarks such as pictures can help with orientation.

The human brain has everything a hill walker might put in a rucksack. Studies in rats have revealed three types of cells that enable navigation: place cells, which fire at certain locations; head-direction cells, which track the orientation of the head; and grid cells, which set up a coordinate system for assessing scale and distance.

Learning the layout of city streets has been shown to increase the size of part of a taxi driver’s hippocampus, and a similar effect has been observed in musicians. While improvising music, a free-jazz saxophonist ‘sees’ a landscape of notes to navigate.

Fresh locational cues can conflict with the maps in our brains. It is unsurprising that it takes time to reorient when we emerge from an underground station or that the voice of the in-car satellite-navigation system grates on us.

Our brains must decide whether to accept new information and rejig our internal maps or to reject it as being wrong. A simple, reliable cue — such as a north-facing arrow at the top of an escalator — can help to speed up reorientation.

Credit: Derek P.

*Thanks Derek for this tidbit advice.

Mt 18:11 “For the Son of man is come to save that which was lost. “

Helping Them Cry

help_them_cry

A little girl who was late coming home for supper. Her mother made the expected irate parent’s demand to know where she had been.

The little girl replied that she had stopped to help Janie, whose bicycle was broken in a fall.

“But you don’t know anything about fixing bicycles,” her mother responded.

“I know that,” the girl said. “I just stopped to help her cry.”

Not many of us know anything about fixing bicycles, either. And when our friends have fallen and broken, not their bicycles but their lives, none of us knows how to fix that. We simply cannot “fix” someone else’s life, even though that’s what we would like most to do. We can help them cry and encourage them that there’s an answer in reach.

But like the little girl, we can stop to help them cry and encourage them that there is hope and that things can be fixed. That is the best we can do. And that is a lot!

We cannot “fix” people’s lives, but we can point to Who can. We all have opinions, but that’s not what people need, they need our good moral truthful advice.
1 Pet 3:15 But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear: …”
1 Sam 30:6 “……but David encouraged himself in the LORD his God. ”

Rev 7:17 “For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.”

Rev 21:4 “And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away.”

 

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