Really Living Off the Land (LINK/TRUE STORY)

The Craftsmanship Of Living In The Wilderness

“Many of us would love the opportunity to do such a thing; although I honestly have to ask if we would do it, given the chance. Voicing such a desire when we’re sitting warm and comfortable at home is easy. But packing up and actually doing it is much harder. Yet, there are a few people who do just that; ……..”

“………..Living in the wild doesn’t require the courage to stare down a bear and arm wrestle it; it requires the courage to befriend that bear and be a good neighbor to it. If you have to fight the bear every time you see it, you will spend all your time fighting bears. But if you learn to live with the bear, befriending it, you can enjoy one another’s company, on those rare occasions when you meet…..”

READ MORE HERE:

http://www.survivopedia.com/the-craftsmanship-of-living-in-the-wilderness/

Richard Louis “Dick” Proenneke (WIKI):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Proenneke

 

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Keep Your Integrity

A teacher once told me that a parent with a lot of money asked him to change and make her child’s end of grades more favorable it could be “profitable.” The teacher said he thought long and hard about what was asked of him but refused, and knowing it would make the parent angry, still refused to change any grades.

His moral courage should be commended. Sad that it takes courage to even do the right thing these days, especially in such a clear case as this, but in the real world, people with power and money many times retaliate when they don’t get what they want. And that can make everyone’s lives difficult.

Moral courage and integrity are much-needed fibers of our conscience and character. The personal costs of putting our integrity on the line are so high that we have to take risks. Once we descend the slippery slope of moral compromise, it’s hard to resist the inevitable slide.

In looking at this case, our first thoughts of discernment is that this parent subjected the teacher to this corrupt and corrupting request was a bad person, and very may have been but we can, in all fairness deduce that she was basically a decent mom strongly intent on helping her child that she ignored her moral values (if she had any).

It’s wrong to ask someone to lie or cheat or entice others with financial gain for an immoral and deceitful act. When it comes from someone with power and or money, it’s worse. Power and money corrupt those who have a lot of it and can be an intimidating factor even when it’s not used, yet known of about someone.

But integrity can be an even greater intimidating power. Improper requests deserve an immediate, firm, and dignified response that leaves no doubt that they’re inappropriate. Be careful not to be too self-righteous though. Let the person worry about what you think of them. If they persist, let them and don’t worry about the consequences. Do what’s right all the time and in the end, you’ll feel better about yourself and things will fall more into place in your favor in the long run. That’s positive!

Credit : M. Josephson for structure

Thanks M. Josephson

Heaven’s Grocery Store (POEM)

“I was walking down life’s highway
a long time ago,
and I saw a sign that read:
Heaven’s Grocery Store

As I got a little closer,
the door came wide open,
and as I looked intently,
suddenly I was standing inside.

I saw angels,
they were standing everywhere.
One handed me a basket and said,
“My child shop with care.”

Everything a Christian needed.
was in that grocery store.
All you could carry that day;
and can return the next day for more.

First I got some PATIENCE,
and LOVE was in the same row.
Further down was UNDERSTANDING,
which you need everywhere you go.

I got a box or two of WISDOM,
a bag or two of FAITH.
And I didn’t want to miss out on
the HOLY SPIRIT; He was abundant in this place.

I stepped to get some STRENGTH and COURAGE,
to help me run the race.
By now my basket was getting full,
but I remembered I needed GRACE.

How could I forget SALVATION,
for salvation, well, that was free!
So I tried to get plenty of that,
there was enough to save both you and me.

Then I started up to the counter,
to pay my grocery bill.
I thought I had everything I needed
to do my Master’s will.

As I went up to the last aisle,
I saw PRAYER and grabbed some,
for I knew when I stepped outside,
I would run right into sin.

PEACE and JOY were plentiful,
they were on the last shelf.
SONG and PRAISE were standing near;
so I helped myself.

Then I said to the angel,
“How much do I owe?”
He smiled and said,
“Just take them everywhere you go.”

Again, I smiled at him and said,
“How much do I really owe?”
Again, he smiled and said,
“My child, JESUS PAID ALL THAT YOU OWE,
HE PAID YOUR BILL A LONG, LONG TIME AGO.”

Have you gone shopping lately?

-Author, UNKNOWN

Moral Courage: It’s Value

Courage is a highly admired virtue. Most often we associate the word with physical prowess or bravery. But there’s another form of valor that’s much more important because it comes up more often. It’s called moral courage – the willingness to face not physical danger but emotional pain, disapproval, financial insecurity, or uncertainty rather than compromise an ethical principle.

Moral courage is essential not only for a virtuous life, but a happy one. Without courage, we have no control over our lives. Our fears corrode our spirit and confine us like a barbed wire fence. That’s why they say a coward dies a thousand deaths, a brave man but one.

Integrity is essential to self-esteem and the admiration of others. It requires us to put our comforts, possessions, friendships, and even jobs at risk in the defense of deeply held principles.

It takes moral fortitude to be honest at the risk of ridicule, rejection, or retaliation or when doing so may jeopardize our income or career. It takes boldness to be accountable and own up to mistakes when doing so may get us in trouble. It takes backbone to stand tough with our kids when doing so may cost us their affection.

Mark Twain said, ‘Courage is not the absence of fear but the resistance of fear, the mastery of fear.’ To paraphrase President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the enemy is not what we fear; it is fear itself. If our insecurities and anxieties cause us to lose confidence in the power of virtue, we will lose something very precious.

People with moral courage rarely get medals, but it is the best marker of true character and a virtue others can be proud of.

BONUS VIDS I LIKED; SHARE EM’ ! I DID ….

The Jungle Bed

Smoke free tepee?! How to dig an air tunnel underneath!

My Thanks and support to Corporal Kelly@ Corporal’s Corner and Lilly@ SurvivalLilly

Courage & Strength

It takes strength to be certain,
It takes courage to have doubts.

It takes strength to fit in,
It takes courage to stand out.

It takes strength to share a friend’s pain,
It takes courage to feel your own pain.

It takes strength to hide your own pain,
It takes courage to show it and deal with it.

It takes strength to stand guard,
It takes courage to let down your guard.

It takes strength to conquer,
It takes courage to surrender.

It takes strength to endure abuse,
It takes courage to stop it.

It takes strength to stand alone,
It takes courage to lean on a friend.

It takes strength to love,
It takes courage to beloved.

It takes strength to live,
It takes courage to survive.

Ps 27:14 “Wait on the LORD: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the LORD.”

Ps 31:24 “Be of good courage, and he shall strengthen your heart, all ye that hope in the LORD.”

The Weeds

*  A refurbished story

Isn’t it amazing how you never have to water your weeds or nurture them and they still give you an unwanted crop?

I can remember as a young boy growing up in Santa Cruz, California my grandfather showed me how to dig up this pesky weed called Bermuda grass. It was terrible stuff and it would really spread if you didn’t get it out by the roots.

That was then. But more recently when my wife and I bought our first home about 8 years ago; guess what I had to deal with? If you said weeds, you are correct. There was this certain patch of weeds that was similar to the Bermuda grass. In other words, just as invasive.

After getting the inside of our home settled, it was time to work on the outside. On my hands and knees I vigorously attacked the weeds with a small hand trowel getting each one out by the roots. Spring after, spring that was my ritual.

Just this Spring I realized that one particular weed was no longer prevalent but another one was in full force. So again, I got down on my hands and knees and got to work ridding them from my yard. When I was finished, my yard was better off.

Moral OF THE STORY? Sometimes our life can be very similar. Yes, we all have weeds in our life. These weeds can be challenges, setbacks, negative people, immoral behaviors or naysayers, and the list can go on and on.

The solution is when dealing with these weeds of life is to get to the root of it and remove them one by one from your life and eventually you will conquer this round. And when another crop of weeds shows up, deal with them directly before they spread, because now that you know what to do with them by getting to the root of it, it will give you more courage and wisdom the next time a problem or one similar crops up.

You could say we all need weeds in our life to challenge us. But once you know how to handle the weeds in your yard to make it beautiful – so too will your life be.

PLEASE NOTE: If you really have a weed problem there are many other safer options than poisons; lab created monsters we call weed killer, herbicide, etc.

Stay away from this guy! > ROUND UP (Link Here)

 

 

 

 

In Spite of the Odds

*Shared Story

**’Dedicated to all the courageous Dad’s and families in the world.’

Early in 2003 Fred Evans fell and broke his hip. Not unusual for a man of 88. However, it was the events over the next few weeks that showed the world what this man was made of.

The next day he had an operation which turned out to be a total hip replacement.

Within a few days he was sent to a Rehabilitation Hospital, with all the usual hopes for a complete recovery for a man of his age and situation: ‘absolutely none,’ said the medical experts and nursing staff!

Funny about that, absolutely no hope at all.

My first conversation with Dad was a few days after his admittance to the Rehab Hospital in Sydney.

‘A bit of pain Son,’ he tells me … ‘but I’ll be okay.’

‘See all of these other old blokes in here, most of them have been in here for between 3 and 6 months, with no hope of ever going home.’

‘”No way will I end up like them!’

‘I will go home to your Mom within the next few weeks!’

Because of the distance between Newcastle and his Rehab Hospital, I didn’t get to see him every day, but phoned regularly. I got to see him each weekend.

On my next visit I stopped at reception on the way to his ward. The duty nurse gave me a ‘rave review’ of his progress, saying that they didn’t believe what they were seeing. ‘Your Father is a walking miracle,’ I was told.

As I approached Dad’s bed I saw him getting something from the other side of his bed as he was swinging himself into a position to get up and spend some time with me. Walking sticks.

‘Thanks for coming in to see me Son, it’s good to see you, come for a slow walk with me,’ he said.

He proudly assured me that he was okay to do it on his own, but it would be nice if I were right there next to him as we ‘walked.’ Sure enough, he had been so determined to get home to his wife of 62 years, he had been training hard every day!

So we went for a stroll around the corridors of his prison, and was he proud of his ability to conquer the odds? You bet he was!

Only 3 weeks after being admitted to that ‘depressing place,’ he walked out without any assistance from anyone. Just as I had been told – a walking miracle.

He only had one motive, but a very powerful one. To get home to his beautiful wife of 62 years, my Mom Margaret … he missed her. His determination, courage, and incredible love and devotion towards my Mother (after all that time together) was an inspiration to me that can’t be overstated. I thank him for that!

Fred Evans was a gentle caring man, with the courage and inner strength of a lion, and the heart of a Saint.

I had only recently grown to appreciate that I was so lucky to have such a mentor, and to realize that I was absolutely blessed to have had that experience. It wasn’t too late though. I got to tell him how much he meant to me, and to thank him for being who he was, and to share some amazing moments with him towards the end of his humble, quietly-lived life.

Over the next few months his fate occurred- common medical complications took him from us, but he left us all with memories of what it’s like to spend some time with someone special. Thanks Dad.

May this inspire you to overcome some form of adversity in your own life by showing some courage – despite the odds.

Credit: Philip E.
This is a true story. Thanks Philip for sharing.

Rev 3:2 “Be watchful, and strengthen the things which remain, that are ready to die: for I have not found thy works perfect before God.