Future Provisions

*Survival knowledge

One of the main reasons for studying how people survive, whether economically or physically, is to find lessons we can apply to our own lives and circumstances. For many years, economists have been predicting an economic collapse here in America. If you are one of the 93+ million Americans who are out of work, your own personal economy has already collapsed.

Now it’s time to consider how you will earn money, whether you are currently out of work. In the days of the Great Depression, it was common for grocers and landlords to provide credit to their customers. Today? That would be a rare occurrence.

Our ancestors would be sad to see their children (us) toiling over these uncertain times. This was suppose to be a land of freedom and a new start. What happened?

From the Depression, there is an abundance of stories of neighbors and church families showing up at the door, laden with bags and boxes of food for a needy family(this act of kindness now is becoming illegal in many cities). When a desperate mom was asked by her child, “Mama, what’s for dinner tonight?”, the response was, “Whatever the neighbors decide to bring us!” I wish I could imagine that happening today, but our communities and families have become so fractured over the past few decades it would be a rare event.

Perhaps the most impressive thing about the Great Depression is the ingenuity of the Americans who lived through those tough times. Many continued to find ways to earn money, even when their own circumstances were dire.

To earn money, people made homemade fudge, pies and bread and sold them. Eggs could be sold for 25 cents a dozen. If a family lived near water, they could catch and sell fish, clams and crabs(this act too is becoming more and more strict). Some families grew, picked, and sold homegrown produce, and some even started lunch truck wagons (regulation of growers are also under attack).

You could also earn money selling newspapers on the corner(almost a thing of the past). Kids earned a little extra if they were promoted to “Corner Captain”, a sort of Great Depression multi-level marketing program where a kid brought in other kids to sell papers and earned a bit extra himself(no loitering now!). Odd jobs were also a popular way of making money, washing windows, loading coal, even sewing and altering clothes(days of money under the table are wearing thin).

In every case, it was a simple matter of looking around to see what people needed, what they wanted, what made them feel good about themselves and about life.

So, what skills do you have that might offer a service during a severe economic downturn? What knowledge do you have that would be helpful, even vital, to others? What products can you produce? What skills can you teach?

Ingenuity is something which can never be stolen by thieves, confiscated by a government, or lost to flood or fire. It is possible to survive during even a newer Great Depression and there is plenty to learn from those who lived through the last one.

Find a book, read, use the internet, take notes, watch videos from people who know, from those who’ve done it. Knowledge is a good thing if used to help others. And there are plenty out there who need help.

We are all in this (and will be in the future) together; let’s help one another keep going when the SHTF!

*Thanks in more part to :Frank M.

 

Depression 2018-2025

We have become a wasteful nation. We are quick to discard things, quick to rack up debt, and quick to feel like we have outgrown an item before we have even broken it in. We toss away the dinner leftovers because we get bored with them and pitch a shirt because it has lost a button.

Instead of learning the skills our parents or grandparents used to stretch a buck and make an item last, we feel like we deserve more. We pitch the item and charge our credit cards with the replacement.

But you know what we really need? Financial peace. Contentment with what we have. Freedom from the need to constantly upgrade. These are essential to survival.

Reuse things, don’t throw them out. Grandpa always told me how during the depression that there was a shortage of tires. My grandpa and his brother would always go to the local landfill, and scour for old tires to repair and reuse. They always did what they needed to just get by.

Buy wholesale.

Whether it was buying seed, flour, or parts, Grandpa always explained to me the benefits of buying wholesale, and how much money he’d save doing so. Grandpa spoke of how his parents would buy wholesale garden bulk items from town and store their large purchases in the attic.

Help your neighbors.

The years of the Great Depression forced a lot of people to help their neighbors out. Frequently, neighbors would share the produce in their gardens, assist in field work, assist with repairs, and lend machinery to one another. These steps would help people save money and make it through the Great Depression.

If anything identifies us as Americans, it’s we help and love one another!

Make goods yourself (versus paying retail). I saw how often my Grandpa and his brother would make their own hog troughs, modified wagon parts, or combine parts. By making parts themselves they’d typically save 50% off what the local implements or parts dealer would charge. It’s again another remind of how resourceful the Great Depression generation lived and another way they saved money.

We’re not trying to put businesses out of business, but in times where it’s lean for people, you have to do what you have to do!

Become allergic to debt.

For most folks today, a chunk of their income goes toward paying interest on loans and credit cards. My grandparents always talked about how people got swamped by their debt payments as farmers headed into the Depression. As a result, a lot of farmers and families lost their farms due to this burden. In addition, Grandpa always talked about how certain folks would get swamped by credit cards, and how detestable that was. Grandpa always felt like debt was a disease or virus that needed to be avoided at all costs! He talked first-hand about how his Dad lost a farm due to too much debt. The bitter taste of debt remained with him his entire life.

Face it, unless you win the lottery, you will never have large debts paid off; only the interest is paid on most loans!

When was the last time you were able to really save BIG drops of money? Start today, for go that new phone, if your old version works, and the old plan is acceptable; leave the upgrades for other people- save your money! Even a few dollars stacked on one another looks good at the end of 6 months. And share, share tips and post what you do online; the it will change your life and of those around you.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Great tips Frank, Thanks!!!

 
Lk 6:35 “But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil.”

 
Mk 12:31 “And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.”

 
Rom 15:2 “Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.”

Love Led the Way

Sometimes we need a good story to get us going. I found this by Harriet Savitz, and thought it worthy to share. I have nothing to add, except I liked what she said and thought she had something to say. Love these days is in short supply…the demand for it is exponentially great and there are so many fakes of love. I can’t say where love might find you or where it may lead you, but for this women, she let it lead her back to life. Let love lead you back to life once more! –Moraldiplomat

love_led_the_way

Love Led the Way

“I am 68 and I am still learning about love. When I was younger, I loved most everything. I loved chocolate sundaes, dancing, my new typewriter and also included in my loving list were my parents, my husband, my children, and my pets. I loved each day, and the busyness of it, and I loved filling it with challenges. “I love this,” I would say easily. And then the next minute, I would love something else also. There seemed no limit to the loving. It came so easy and there was so much to love.

But now I am more careful about my love supply. I know what it is like to love and lose a partner. The loving becomes painful. I know what it is like to love and lose a friend. The loving leaves an ache somewhere inside me. I know what it is like to make a mistake about those I loved. Perhaps they do not deserve this gift I offer… I have wasted my love, thrown it away, misplaced it, used it, and misused it. And often when I think it has gone forever, love surprises me by returning, stronger then ever and with a larger supply. As if it were off somewhere preparing for the shortage.

I know I would learn something if love could answer a few questions. One would be, “Where do you come from when you enter without knocking, and where do you go when you leave without warning?” “How do I keep you by my side?” I see love in people my age as they crochet afghans for their children, stitching their love into a pattern. I see it in hours spent waiting for a telephone call, a visit, a loving reminder that they are needed. People fall in love and out of it, love desperately, love eternally. The words, “I love you,” can shake a dynasty, affect worldly decisions, change one’s lifetime. At this end of my calendar years, I know no more about love than I did at the beginning. Except that I dare not be without it.

I was recovering from a stomach virus at my daughter’s home. And feeling quite sorry for myself. Television annoyed me. I was impatient with well-wishers on the telephone. I didn’t want to look out the window and watch other people enjoy the day. I thought of all the bleak things I could remember and piled them up in front of me. One day passed into two. Reading material lay scattered on the bed, but remained ignored. I had more important matters to attend. Self pity was one of them. I felt old, spent, used up, discarded, and mean. I was angry at my body, at my age, at all the things I hoped yet to do but couldn’t, at the energy that played tricks on me, and at the unpredictability of life. Such as a virus coming in, attacking without warning, and claiming victory.

On the third day, as I lay on the pillow, realizing I felt better and yet, unwilling to reenter life’s merry-go-round with all the responsibilities waiting for me, a paper airplane glided into the room and landed beside me on the bed. I looked up. The room was empty. I picked up the airplane and inspected it. A message written on its wings, said, “Get well soon Grandmom. I love you. Ryan.”

I heard activity outside the room. A snowstorm was brewing. Everyone was in the attic getting out sleds and boots. I left the bed and walked toward the doorway, carrying my paper airplane.

It was time to reenter the world. Love led the way.”

by: Harriet May Savitz

Thanks Harriet!

HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND!

The Happiness Gene

happy_gene

The “Pursuit of Happiness,” is guaranteed by the Declaration of Independence. It also may be inherited.

Dr. David Lykken, professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota, reported on a major new study of twins. He says, “We found that identical twins who begin life as a single egg that divides and who therefore have the same genetic blueprint, have very similar happiness scores.” It’s as if we have a built-in happiness thermostat, set at the factory by our genes. That “gene” could have only occurred by design.

A low setting means we’re grumpy and a high setting means we’re cheerful. Some medical experts point to the MRIs of a happy person’s brain that glows like a light bulb.

Does that mean that some people are doomed for the grump-pile of life? Not at all. Like correcting a bicycle that has a natural tendency to pull to the left, you can take charge and correct the error.

Dr. Lykken is convinced you can rise above your fixed set point of happiness by 25 percent or more — by attacking the big three: depression, irritability and fearfulness.

What’s the key? Fill your life with a steady diet of small, happy pleasures.

Jer 1:5 ‘Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee; and before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified thee, and I ordained thee a prophet unto the nations.”

Ps 144:15 “Happy is that people, that is in such a case: yea, Happy is that people, whose God is the LORD.”

Ps 146:5 “Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help, whose hope is in the LORD his God:…”

The Right Moves

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shared story

One day, many years ago, when I was working as a psychologist at a children’s institution in England, an adolescent boy showed up in the waiting room. I went out there where he was walking up and down restlessly.

I showed him into my office and pointed to the chair on the other side of my desk. It was in late autumn, and the lilac bush outside the window had shed all its leaves. “Please sit down,” I said.

David wore a black rain coat that was buttoned all the way up to his neck. His face was pale, and he stared at his feet while wringing his hands nervously. He had lost his father as an infant, and had lived together with his mother and grandfather since. But the year before David turned 13, his grandfather died and his mother was killed in a car accident. Now he was 14 and in family care.

His head teacher had referred him to me. “This boy,” he wrote, “is understandably very sad and depressed. He refuses to talk to others and I’m very worried about him. Can you help?”

I looked at David. How could I help him? There are human tragedies psychology doesn’t have the answer to, and which no words can describe. Sometimes the best thing one can do is to listen openly and sympathetically.

The first two times we met, David didn’t say a word. He sat hunched up in the chair and only looked up to look at the children’s drawings on the wall behind me. As he was about to leave after the second visit, I put my hand on his shoulder. He didn’t shrink back, but he didn’t look at me either.

“Come back next week, if you like,” I said. I hesitated a bit. Then I said, “I know it hurts.”

He came, and I suggested we play a game of chess. He nodded. After that we played chess every Wednesday afternoon – in complete silence and without making any eye contact. It’s not easy to cheat in chess, but I admit that I made sure David won once or twice.

Usually, he arrived earlier than agreed, took the chessboard and pieces from the shelf and began setting them up before I even got a chance to sit down. It seemed as if he enjoyed my company. But why did he never look at me?

“Perhaps he simply needs someone to share his pain with,” I thought. “Perhaps he senses that I respect his suffering.” One afternoon in late winter, David took off his rain coat and put it on the back of the chair. While he was setting up the chess pieces, his face seemed more alive and his motions more lively.

Some months later, when the lilacs blossomed outside, I sat starring at David’s head, while he was bent over the chessboard. I thought about how little we know about therapy – about the mysterious process associated with healing. Suddenly, he looked up at me.

“It’s your turn,” he said.

After that day, David started talking. He got friends in school and joined a bicycle club. He wrote to me a few times (“I’m biking with some friends and I feel great”); letters about how he would try to get into university. After some time, the letters stopped. Now he had really started to live his own life.

Maybe I gave David something. At least I learned a lot from him. I learned how time makes it possible to overcome what seems to be an insuperable pain. I learned to be there for people who need me. And David showed me how one – without any words – can reach out to another person. All it takes is a hug, a shoulder to cry on, a friendly touch, a sympathetic nature – and an ear that listens.

Many of us suffer with pain and have forgiven and forgotten; moving on we join back with the living and share our weapons that have given us victory to others in our life. That’s what we do. We encourage others to be strong, give them a reason (as we found) to keep going. I’m not saying that we should take up chess, but let this inspire you to use what you know; Who you know, and what you do to uplift others or just be a caring soul in the midst of their fiery trial encouraging them in the right Way that leads to overcoming adversity. Earth has become an even worse place to grow up. But don’t despair; trials are but for a moment.

2 Cor 4:17-18 “For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory; While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.”

Jn 16:33 “These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.”

1 Jn 5:4 “For whatsoever is born of God overcometh the world: and this is the victory that overcometh the world, even our faith.”

1 Peter 4:12-13 “Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you: But rejoice, inasmuch as ye are partakers of Christ’s sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy.”