Future Provisions

*Survival knowledge

One of the main reasons for studying how people survive, whether economically or physically, is to find lessons we can apply to our own lives and circumstances. For many years, economists have been predicting an economic collapse here in America. If you are one of the 93+ million Americans who are out of work, your own personal economy has already collapsed.

Now it’s time to consider how you will earn money, whether you are currently out of work. In the days of the Great Depression, it was common for grocers and landlords to provide credit to their customers. Today? That would be a rare occurrence.

Our ancestors would be sad to see their children (us) toiling over these uncertain times. This was suppose to be a land of freedom and a new start. What happened?

From the Depression, there is an abundance of stories of neighbors and church families showing up at the door, laden with bags and boxes of food for a needy family(this act of kindness now is becoming illegal in many cities). When a desperate mom was asked by her child, “Mama, what’s for dinner tonight?”, the response was, “Whatever the neighbors decide to bring us!” I wish I could imagine that happening today, but our communities and families have become so fractured over the past few decades it would be a rare event.

Perhaps the most impressive thing about the Great Depression is the ingenuity of the Americans who lived through those tough times. Many continued to find ways to earn money, even when their own circumstances were dire.

To earn money, people made homemade fudge, pies and bread and sold them. Eggs could be sold for 25 cents a dozen. If a family lived near water, they could catch and sell fish, clams and crabs(this act too is becoming more and more strict). Some families grew, picked, and sold homegrown produce, and some even started lunch truck wagons (regulation of growers are also under attack).

You could also earn money selling newspapers on the corner(almost a thing of the past). Kids earned a little extra if they were promoted to “Corner Captain”, a sort of Great Depression multi-level marketing program where a kid brought in other kids to sell papers and earned a bit extra himself(no loitering now!). Odd jobs were also a popular way of making money, washing windows, loading coal, even sewing and altering clothes(days of money under the table are wearing thin).

In every case, it was a simple matter of looking around to see what people needed, what they wanted, what made them feel good about themselves and about life.

So, what skills do you have that might offer a service during a severe economic downturn? What knowledge do you have that would be helpful, even vital, to others? What products can you produce? What skills can you teach?

Ingenuity is something which can never be stolen by thieves, confiscated by a government, or lost to flood or fire. It is possible to survive during even a newer Great Depression and there is plenty to learn from those who lived through the last one.

Find a book, read, use the internet, take notes, watch videos from people who know, from those who’ve done it. Knowledge is a good thing if used to help others. And there are plenty out there who need help.

We are all in this (and will be in the future) together; let’s help one another keep going when the SHTF!

*Thanks in more part to :Frank M.

 

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Depression 2018-2025

We have become a wasteful nation. We are quick to discard things, quick to rack up debt, and quick to feel like we have outgrown an item before we have even broken it in. We toss away the dinner leftovers because we get bored with them and pitch a shirt because it has lost a button.

Instead of learning the skills our parents or grandparents used to stretch a buck and make an item last, we feel like we deserve more. We pitch the item and charge our credit cards with the replacement.

But you know what we really need? Financial peace. Contentment with what we have. Freedom from the need to constantly upgrade. These are essential to survival.

Reuse things, don’t throw them out. Grandpa always told me how during the depression that there was a shortage of tires. My grandpa and his brother would always go to the local landfill, and scour for old tires to repair and reuse. They always did what they needed to just get by.

Buy wholesale.

Whether it was buying seed, flour, or parts, Grandpa always explained to me the benefits of buying wholesale, and how much money he’d save doing so. Grandpa spoke of how his parents would buy wholesale garden bulk items from town and store their large purchases in the attic.

Help your neighbors.

The years of the Great Depression forced a lot of people to help their neighbors out. Frequently, neighbors would share the produce in their gardens, assist in field work, assist with repairs, and lend machinery to one another. These steps would help people save money and make it through the Great Depression.

If anything identifies us as Americans, it’s we help and love one another!

Make goods yourself (versus paying retail). I saw how often my Grandpa and his brother would make their own hog troughs, modified wagon parts, or combine parts. By making parts themselves they’d typically save 50% off what the local implements or parts dealer would charge. It’s again another remind of how resourceful the Great Depression generation lived and another way they saved money.

We’re not trying to put businesses out of business, but in times where it’s lean for people, you have to do what you have to do!

Become allergic to debt.

For most folks today, a chunk of their income goes toward paying interest on loans and credit cards. My grandparents always talked about how people got swamped by their debt payments as farmers headed into the Depression. As a result, a lot of farmers and families lost their farms due to this burden. In addition, Grandpa always talked about how certain folks would get swamped by credit cards, and how detestable that was. Grandpa always felt like debt was a disease or virus that needed to be avoided at all costs! He talked first-hand about how his Dad lost a farm due to too much debt. The bitter taste of debt remained with him his entire life.

Face it, unless you win the lottery, you will never have large debts paid off; only the interest is paid on most loans!

When was the last time you were able to really save BIG drops of money? Start today, for go that new phone, if your old version works, and the old plan is acceptable; leave the upgrades for other people- save your money! Even a few dollars stacked on one another looks good at the end of 6 months. And share, share tips and post what you do online; the it will change your life and of those around you.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Great tips Frank, Thanks!!!

 
Lk 6:35 “But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil.”

 
Mk 12:31 “And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.”

 
Rom 15:2 “Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.”

Get Started

Chris’s parents were proud of him when he graduated from college. But it’s been six months and he hasn’t gotten a job yet. In fact, he hasn’t looked seriously. He has no idea what he wants to do and he’s thinking of grad school.

He’s living at home with his parents and things are getting tense, especially with his father, who accuses Chris of being lazy and afraid to enter the real world.

Chris thinks his dad is being totally unreasonable. After all, he’s only young once and he needs some ‘space.’ During a recent argument, Chris said, ‘I’m not you, Dad. I have my own way of doing things. I want a job I enjoy.’

His dad replied, ‘That’s a nice idea, but in the end they call it ‘work’ because it’s about making a productive living – not having fun.’

There are many youngsters like Chris who are having trouble getting started with a serious job and becoming self-reliant. Some, like Peter Pan, just don’t want to grow up. Some are afraid of making a wrong decision or of being rejected. Others are victims of what psychologists call ‘magical thinking.’ They believe that when the time is right, everything will fall into place. So they wait for opportunity to come knocking or until they feel inspired or excited about their next step.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. What’s crucial is to begin. Things happen and opportunities appear most often when we’re moving, not standing still.

Momentum is vital. Basic physics says it’s easier to alter the course of a moving object than to start movement initially. In the end, it’s not really about finding yourself. It’s about making yourself.

The first steps are the hardest, but the key to success in anything is getting started.

Heb 12:1 “Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, ….”

Hobo Life

‘For as long as man has organized into society, there have been those on the fringe. These were people who, for one reason or another, just didn’t fit into polite society.

Such were the hobos of our nation’s past. We tend to think of hobos as bums who stole rides on trains and lived in shanty towns. But in some cases, they were traveling workers who would go where there was work and move on when the job was done.

These were tough men, accustomed to backbreaking work and long hours. They survived and endured, becoming a forgotten part of our country’s history. Yet the work that they did has often survived and become part of making our country what it is today.

Looking back at the lives of these men we can see their lifestyle was built around the need to survive. Basically, everything they did was based on that one need.

There are quite a few lessons we can learn from the hobos of days gone by.

Lesson one, you gotta be tough. Physical toughness is essential for surviving in adverse circumstances. A lot of us in the survival movement aren’t as physically fit as we need to be (myself included). But toughness goes beyond just being physically fit.

A boxer learns to take blows, just as he learns how to give them. Strength and agility allow him to give them, but toughness allows him to take them. If you’re not tough, you’re not going to be able to take the blows that life gives you; you’ll fold and just wait to die.

There are two types of toughness: physical and mental. Of the two, mental toughness can be harder to develop than physical.

If your mind can’t take the blows and bounce back, you are at a disadvantage. Your mind must be able to accept the changing reality of a crisis or a disaster, quickly overcome the grief, and move into survival mode.

This is all about training. The better trained you are, the better you can adapt. Training also gives you confidence, so that you know you’re able to survive.

Hobo lesson two, learn a variety of skills, and be willing to do the work. Hobos did whatever the job called for. While they may not have been experts in any one trade, they were still capable of working in many of them. One month they might be busting broncos and the next swinging a double jack in a mine.

Today’s society has become so specialized, in some cases one engineer can only work on one part of a project. He’s lost when he looks at the rest. But in Henry Ford’s day, the guy who designed the engine could also design the body.

In a survival situation, you need to have a wide variety of skills. If your home is damaged by a hurricane and you need to make it safe to sleep in, you don’t have to be a master carpenter. But you will probably need to be able to cut boards and nail them together. You’re probably also going to need to know a little plumbing and electrical work.

Hobo lesson three, develop a minimalist lifestyle. When you’re on the go, you can’t take a lot of extra baggage with you. You’ve got to cut things down to what you really need. Our modern lifestyle is so cluttered with stuff that we’d need a backpack the size of a semi-trailer to bug out.

Learn what you need and then cut down to that point. If you’ve got stuff in your house that you never use, then why do you have it? Really, if you haven’t used it in a year or two, you probably won’t. So, pass it on to someone who can use it and make room in your life for what you need.
Remember, we’re all in this together’

Credit: Derek P.

*Thanks Derek, Good info; something people might not know they need until the SHTF!

READ MORE HERE > hobo-handbook

Jas 2:5 “Hearken, my beloved brethren, Hath not God chosen the poor of this world rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he hath promised to them that love him?”


 

Ways to Keep Employees From Quiting

It’s pretty incredible how often you hear managers complaining about their best employees leaving, and they really do have something to complain about – few things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door. Managers tend to blame their turnover problems on everything under the sun, while ignoring the crux of the matter . . . people don’t leave jobs; they leave managers.

The sad thing is that this can easily be avoided. All that’s required is a new perspective and some extra effort on the manager’s part.

First, we need to understand the nine worst things that managers do that send good people packing.

1. They overwork people

Nothing burns good employees out quite like overworking them. It’s so tempting to work your best people hard that managers frequently fall into this trap. Overworking good employees is perplexing; it makes them feel as if they’re being punished for great performance. Overworking employees is also counterproductive. New research from Stanford shows that productivity per hour declines sharply when the workweek exceeds 50 hours, and productivity drops off so much after 55 hours that you don’t get anything out of working more.

If you must increase how much work your talented employees are doing, you’d better increase their status as well. Talented employees will take on a bigger workload, but they won’t stay if their job suffocates them in the process. Raises, promotions, and title-changes are all acceptable ways to increase workload. If you simply increase workload because people are talented, without changing a thing, they will seek another job that gives them what they deserve.

2. They don’t recognize contributions and reward good work

It’s easy to underestimate the power of a pat on the back, especially with top performers who are intrinsically motivated. Everyone likes kudos, none more so than those who work hard and give their all. Managers need to communicate with their people to find out what makes them feel good (for some, it’s a raise; for others, it’s public recognition) and then to reward them for a job well done. With top performers, this will happen often if you’re doing it right.

3. They don’t care about their employees

More than half of people who leave their jobs do so because of their relationship with their boss. Smart companies make certain their managers know how to balance being professional with being human. These are the bosses who celebrate an employee’s success, empathize with those going through hard times, and challenge people, even when it hurts. Bosses who fail to really care will always have high turnover rates. It’s impossible to work for someone eight-plus hours a day when they aren’t personally involved and don’t care about anything other than your production yield.

4. They don’t honor their commitments

Making promises to people places you on the fine line that lies between making them very happy and watching them walk out the door. When you uphold a commitment, you grow in the eyes of your employees because you prove yourself to be trustworthy and honorable (two very important qualities in a boss). But when you disregard your commitment, you come across as slimy, uncaring, and disrespectful. After all, if the boss doesn’t honor his or her commitments, why should everyone else?

5. They hire and promote the wrong people

Good, hard-working employees want to work with like-minded professionals. When managers don’t do the hard work of hiring good people, it’s a major demotivator for those stuck working alongside them. Promoting the wrong people is even worse. When you work your tail off only to get passed over for a promotion that’s given to someone who glad-handed their way to the top, it’s a massive insult. No wonder it makes good people leave.

6. They don’t let people pursue their passions

Talented employees are passionate. Providing opportunities for them to pursue their passions improves their productivity and job satisfaction. But many managers want people to work within a little box. These managers fear that productivity will decline if they let people expand their focus and pursue their passions. This fear is unfounded. Studies show that people who are able to pursue their passions at work experience flow, a euphoric state of mind that is five times more productive than the norm.

7. They fail to develop people’s skills

When managers are asked about their inattention to employees, they try to excuse themselves, using words such as ‘trust,’ ‘autonomy,’ and ’empowerment.’ This is complete nonsense. Good managers manage, no matter how talented the employee. They pay attention and are constantly listening and giving feedback.

Management may have a beginning, but it certainly has no end. When you have a talented employee, it’s up to you to keep finding areas in which they can improve to expand their skill set. The most talented employees want feedback – more so than the less talented ones and it’s your job to keep it coming. If you don’t, your best people will grow bored and complacent.

8. They fail to engage their creativity

The most talented employees seek to improve everything they touch. If you take away their ability to change and improve things because you’re only comfortable with the status quo, this makes them hate their jobs. Caging up this innate desire to create not only limits them, it limits you.

9. They fail to challenge people intellectually

Great bosses challenge their employees to accomplish things that seem inconceivable at first. Instead of setting mundane, incremental goals, they set lofty goals that push people out of their comfort zones. Then, good managers do everything in their power to help them succeed. When talented and intelligent people find themselves doing things that are too easy or boring, they seek other jobs that will challenge their intellects.

Bringing it all together

If you want your best people to stay, you need to think carefully about how you treat them. While good employees are as tough as nails, their talent gives them an abundance of options. You need to make them want to work for you. For some its about more than the price you pay

The inspiration for this article came from a piece authored by Mike M.

*Thanks to Mike and its sender! Good info!

Send me your inspiration and I’ll post it here 🙂

Col 3:22 “Servants, obey in all things your masters according to the flesh; not with eyeservice, as menpleasers; but in singleness of heart, fearing God; …”

Col 4:1 “Masters, give unto your servants that which is just and equal; knowing that ye also have a Master in heaven.”

Mom’s Job

*Dedicated to Jami, Peggy, Charlene, Jo Ann, Lee, Mildred

and all the other mom’s who don’t waiver in faith, who don’t roll with 

the world, but instead love and nurture; teaching their kids the right ways

and values; honoring their husbands– encouraging them in the

admonition of God’s Word.

Mom’s Job

A mother was asked by an officious clerk, ‘What is your occupation?’

She had dedicated herself to the raising of her children and felt that, though she was not financially compensated for her labor, her ‘job’ was of utmost importance. Besides, she resented it when people said she was ‘Just a housewife.’

So she told the clerk that she was a ‘Research Associate in the field of Child Development and Human Relations.’

Duly impressed, the clerk asked her what she did in her field.

This is how the mother replied:

‘I have a continuing program of research (what mother doesn’t?) in the laboratory and in the field. (Normally I would have said indoors and out.)

I’m working for my Masters (the whole darned family) and already have four credits (all daughters). Of course, the job is one of the most demanding in the humanities (any mother care to disagree?) and I often work 14 hours a day (24 is more like it).

But the job is more challenging than most run-of-the-mill careers and the rewards are in satisfaction rather than just money.’

Who can argue? I have been employed in meaningful and challenging careers. And though my own work has required years of study and training, the job that I feel is the most demanding (and rewarding), is that of parenting my children. And the most crucial.

One young woman said, ‘Mom, I’ll always love you, but I’ll never forgive you for cleaning my face with spit on a hanky!’

But you have to appreciate mothers. Like a Spanish proverb says, ‘An ounce of mother is worth a pound of clergy.’

And a member of the clergy put it like this: ‘My mother practices what I preach.’

The job is one of the most difficult there is, but still remains popular. I think that may be because, though many jobs are important, none is more so.

Eph 6:2 “Honour thy father and mother; which is the first commandment with promise; …

 

The Secret

The old man shuffled slowly into the restaurant. With head tilted and shoulders bent forward, he leaned on his trusty cane with each unhurried step.

His tattered cloth jacket, patched trousers, worn out shoes, and warm personality made him stand out from the usual Saturday morning breakfast crowd. Unforgettable were his pale blue eyes that sparkled like diamonds, large rosy cheeks, and thin lips held in a tight, steady smile.

He stopped, turned with his whole body, and winked at a little girl seated by the door. She flashed a big grin right back at him. A young waitress named Mary watched him shuffle toward a table by the window.
Mary ran over to him, and said, ‘Here, Sir . . . let me give you a hand with that chair.’

Without saying a word, he smiled and nodded a thank you. She pulled the chair away from the table. Steadying him with one arm, she helped him move in front of the chair, and get comfortably seated. Then she scooted the table up close to him, and leaned his cane against the table where he could reach it.

In a soft, clear voice he said, ‘Thank you, Miss . . . and bless you for your kind gestures.’

‘You’re welcome, Sir.’ She replied.

‘And my name is Mary. I’ll be back in a moment and if you need anything at all in the mean time, just wave at me!’

After he had finished a hearty meal of pancakes, bacon and hot lemon tea, Mary brought him the change from his bill. He left it lay on the table. She helped him up from his chair and out from behind the table. She handed him his cane and walked with him to the front door.

Holding the door open for him, she said, ‘Come back and see us, Sir!’

He turned with his whole body, winked and smiled, then nodded a thank you. ‘You are very kind.’ he said softly.

When Mary went to clean his table, she almost fainted. Under his plate she found a business card and a note scribbled on a napkin. Under the napkin was a one hundred dollar bill.

The note on the napkin read . . . ‘Dear Mary, I respect you very much and I can see you respect yourself too. It shows by the way you treat others. You have found the secret of happiness. Your kind gestures will shine through to all those who meet you.’

The man she had waited on was the owner of the restaurant where she worked. This was the first time that she or any of his employees had ever seen him in person.