Survive Tools/Knowledge

It’s one thing to prepare for a temporary disaster like an earthquake or hurricane. It’s a whole other game to prepare for a long-term disaster that cripples the power grid, communication systems, and transportation networks. Without those, we’d basically be living in the 1800’s again. To coin an adage, “it’s not a matter of if, but when.” Whether it’s man-made or nature made, disaster is around many corners. If you’re not listening to God, better get some skills; well, get some skills anyway, if not for yourself, for those around you.

Back in the day, things were very different. People were more hands-on. To get through day-to-day life, they needed all sorts of skills that many people have never even heard of. These skills were so commonplace that they were often take for granted. The average pioneer may have thought, “How could anyone not know how to make soap?”

The modern world has made life so easy there’s simply no need to learn pioneer skills. But if we face a big enough disaster, this will change fast. We’ll discuss some of these lost survival skills which are worth learning if you really want to be prepared for the end of the world as we know it. If your ancestors could to learn these skills, then so can you.

Sewing clothing by hand is going to be the norm after shopping malls and department stores become a thing of the past. You’ll need to know how to use a needle and thread. Additionally, you’ll need to know how to sew buttons and apply patches to clothing as needed.

Knitting is another useful skill you’ll want to have. Without clothing stores, you’ll need to know how to knit socks, hats and fluffy sweaters. Especially in the winter. Another benefit of knitting is the ability to make clothes that you can barter for the things you need.

Making soap will come in handy when your supply of soap runs out or is destroyed. You don’t want to risk your health by not being able to wash your hands regularly. Plus, you’ll feel much more comfortable if you can clean yourself every now and then. Fortunately, soap making is a skill that anyone can learn.

Fire starting without matches or a lighter is one of the most important skills you can learn. Lighters and matches are going to run out eventually, so you need to know how to start a fire without them. Start learning some of the primitive methods for starting a fire and how to keep it burning for hours without going out.

Candle making that uses animal fats, oils or beeswax will ensure you always have light. Your candle making ability will also give you plenty of candles to barter with.

*shared info

Do You Have What it Takes to Survive? Take the quiz now (LINK) 

Recommended (purchase) to add to your bug out bag below!

Survival Spark Magnesium Survival Fire Starter with Compass and Whistle (LINK) 

I’d rather be ready (for the sake of others) and not need to be, than to need to be ready only to find out it’s too late. What seems stupid to do now maybe very wise looking in the days/years ahead. We all want “peace”, but this is earth, and peace the world’s way only leads to bondage and your freedoms taken away; until true peace from God comes to earth, be ready, be wise as serpents and harmless as doves (Mt 10:16); stupid can happen really fast and without warning, you may be called to do things you are not ready, not trained or believe in doing.

Have faith in God, but be aware of the evil of the day (we should not be ignorant of his devices or the people that do his bidding)- We are in this together- it’s not all about you; your neighbors are all around you and they need your help, they need you to know, they need you to stand in the gap; they need your love. Evil, it’s still in the world and has not plans to leave anytime soon.

Jn 15:18 “If the world hate you, ye know that it hated me before it hated you.”

Jn 15:19 “If ye were of the world, the world would love his own: but because ye are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hateth you.”

Jn 17:14 “I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.”

1 Jn 3:13 “Marvel not, my brethren, if the world hate you. ”

Jn 14:27 “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.”

Fix It!

*More Survival Ideas

For most people, purchasing enough food, water and supplies to get through a major disaster can be very difficult financially. The average person doesn’t have a lot of extra cash to put toward such a big investment. If you’re like most people, paying the bills and keeping a roof over your head is hard enough as it is.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to help save a little money to put toward your prepping needs and we’ll discuss some of those things here. Every dollar you can save on household utilities, the grocery bill and so on can be put into your prepping.

Be a MacGyver and become a fix-it guru. Before sending that broken appliance to the garbage heap and replacing it with something new, try to fix it yourself. There are many web sites (www.fixya.com, http://www.instructables.com) that offer lots of how-to’s for fixing everything from your laser printer to your espresso machine. In addition, you can find service manuals for many products on line at the manufacturer’s web site.

Another thing you can do is call the manufacturer’s customer service number. Often the company will guide you through troubleshooting steps or even send you free parts. I have found that this works especially well with plumbing issues.

Move fashion to the bottom of your priorities list. Choose function over fashion. This is difficult, I know. But think about the item you intend to purchase and how it is going to be used. A fancy, Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer may look great on your counter, but if you only cook the basics and bake only simple items, a $15 hand mixer may be all that you need. This same concept applies to lots of things: clothing, TVs, jewelry, you name it. Yes, this even applies to cars.

Do it yourself. Mow your own lawn, clean your own house, give yourself a manicure, wash your own dog. Now if you truly hate to do something, don’t do it if you can afford to hire it out. Or better yet, trade a chore you detest with a chore that someone else dislikes. You both get the job done without spending a dime.

Take advantage of freebies. Use public beaches, parks and trail systems for recreational activities. Use your public library. Go online and download geographically specific recreational guides and even preparedness manuals from your state and county web sites. None of these are technically free because your taxes have paid for them, but they are free in the sense you have no additional out of pocket costs.

Speaking of libraries, have you checked yours out lately? Most libraries now have a robust collection of eBooks, audio books, audio book players, music CDs, DVDs and more. If you don’t have a library with downloadable materials, there are many that will let you purchase an annual non-resident library card. You can do a web search or start here to find a library with a large collection of downloadable materials.

Get out of debt. This is obvious. Sure, you may have a mortgage payment and possibly a car payment. But credit card debt? I hope not, but, if you are saddled with credit card debt, come up with a one or two- year plan to pay them off then toss them in a drawer, never to see daylight again unless there is a dire emergency. The old mantra “use your credit card . . .it is the same as cash” simply does not work anymore. It never did.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Thanks Frank!

Future Provisions

*Survival knowledge

One of the main reasons for studying how people survive, whether economically or physically, is to find lessons we can apply to our own lives and circumstances. For many years, economists have been predicting an economic collapse here in America. If you are one of the 93+ million Americans who are out of work, your own personal economy has already collapsed.

Now it’s time to consider how you will earn money, whether you are currently out of work. In the days of the Great Depression, it was common for grocers and landlords to provide credit to their customers. Today? That would be a rare occurrence.

Our ancestors would be sad to see their children (us) toiling over these uncertain times. This was suppose to be a land of freedom and a new start. What happened?

From the Depression, there is an abundance of stories of neighbors and church families showing up at the door, laden with bags and boxes of food for a needy family(this act of kindness now is becoming illegal in many cities). When a desperate mom was asked by her child, “Mama, what’s for dinner tonight?”, the response was, “Whatever the neighbors decide to bring us!” I wish I could imagine that happening today, but our communities and families have become so fractured over the past few decades it would be a rare event.

Perhaps the most impressive thing about the Great Depression is the ingenuity of the Americans who lived through those tough times. Many continued to find ways to earn money, even when their own circumstances were dire.

To earn money, people made homemade fudge, pies and bread and sold them. Eggs could be sold for 25 cents a dozen. If a family lived near water, they could catch and sell fish, clams and crabs(this act too is becoming more and more strict). Some families grew, picked, and sold homegrown produce, and some even started lunch truck wagons (regulation of growers are also under attack).

You could also earn money selling newspapers on the corner(almost a thing of the past). Kids earned a little extra if they were promoted to “Corner Captain”, a sort of Great Depression multi-level marketing program where a kid brought in other kids to sell papers and earned a bit extra himself(no loitering now!). Odd jobs were also a popular way of making money, washing windows, loading coal, even sewing and altering clothes(days of money under the table are wearing thin).

In every case, it was a simple matter of looking around to see what people needed, what they wanted, what made them feel good about themselves and about life.

So, what skills do you have that might offer a service during a severe economic downturn? What knowledge do you have that would be helpful, even vital, to others? What products can you produce? What skills can you teach?

Ingenuity is something which can never be stolen by thieves, confiscated by a government, or lost to flood or fire. It is possible to survive during even a newer Great Depression and there is plenty to learn from those who lived through the last one.

Find a book, read, use the internet, take notes, watch videos from people who know, from those who’ve done it. Knowledge is a good thing if used to help others. And there are plenty out there who need help.

We are all in this (and will be in the future) together; let’s help one another keep going when the SHTF!

*Thanks in more part to :Frank M.

 

Known By Your Love

*An oldie but goody!Moraldiplomat

Known By Your Love

Henry Drummond has said, ‘The moments when you have really lived are the moments when you have done things in the spirit of love.’

Here is a story (possibly apocryphal, but powerful nevertheless) about a man who acted in the spirit of love and about what he consequently learned.

Many years ago an old man stood on a Virginia riverbank. He was waiting to cross the river and, since it was bitterly cold and there were no bridges, he was hoping to get a ride across on horseback. After a lengthy wait he spotted a group of horsemen approaching. He let the first one pass, then the second, third, fourth and fifth. One rider remained. As he drew abreast, the old man looked him in the eye and said, ‘Sir, would you give me a ride across the river?’

The rider immediately replied, ‘Certainly.’ Once across the river, the old man slid to the ground. ‘Sir,’ the rider said before leaving. ‘I could not help but notice that you permitted all the other men to pass without asking for a ride. Then, when I drew abreast, you immediately asked me to carry you across. I am curious as to why you didn’t ask them and you did ask me.’

The old man quietly responded, ‘I looked into their eyes and could see no love and knew in my own heart it would be useless to ask for a ride. But when I looked into your eyes, I saw compassion, love and the willingness to help. I knew you would be glad to give me a ride across the river.’

The rider was touched. ‘I’m grateful for what you are saying,’ he said. ‘I appreciate it very much.’ With that, Thomas Jefferson turned and rode off to the White House.

It is often said that our eyes are the windows to our souls. If that is true, what is it that our eyes show about us? Or let me ask it a different way: if you had been the last rider, would the old man have asked you for a ride?

A good question. For it is said that others will know us by our love. Some will see it in the things we do and some in the things we say. And a few perceptive souls, like the old man in the story, may catch a glimmer of a loving and generous spirit in the expression of kind eyes.

May you be easily recognized by your love.

Credit: Unknown

Jn 13:34A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another.”

Rom 13:8Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law.”

1 Jn 4:7Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God.”

1 Jn 4:8He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love.

1 Jn 4:12No man hath seen God at any time. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us. ”

1 Jn 4:18There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love.”

Jn 13:35By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.”

Inner Wisdom

*Ever heard of those “good ol’ stories that, well…just needed 

to be shared? I think this is one of them. –Moraldiplomat

Inner Wisdom

As a little red-haired boy growing up in a small town in Pennsylvania, there was nothing I wanted more than a pony. That was my life’s dream, ambition and obsession.

While other boys were trading baseball cards, I was collecting miniature horse statures. When friends wanted to go the movies or roller skating, I had to first rule out any horse shows. By the age of eight, if anything was clear to me it was that If I didn’t get a pony, everything would be wrong in my world. And I understood my only chance was to win one. Thankfully, though our apartment was too small, with a rent too large, my parents seemed happy to buy me a ticket for every win-a-pony contest that came along. They also were quite good at reminding me how greatly the ‘odds’ were stacked against me.

From a toddler until the age of ten, I entered every pony contest I could. Whether it was just stubbornness, or the beauty of innocence, or some kind of soul-certainty I was born with, I didn’t believe that luck was a factor. No. What I believed, with every cell in my body, was that all I needed to do was stay focused on my plan and purpose, and keep trusting my heart. What I knew was that there was a pony stabled in my soul, waiting for me to find her. And that’s what I prayed for every day.

Now . . . what kind of story would this be if I didn’t reveal, after such a heart-tugging lead in, that indeed (and in absolute joy) I did finally win my pony!

What happened was . . . one day while watching my favorite western theme kids show on TV, I was shocked and surprised to hear the cowgirl hostess announce that the station was offering a free pony to any boy or girl who could make the best cattle brand out of their initials.

‘Yee-hah! This is it!’ My heart sang out. ‘My pony is calling to me!’ I was ecstatic!

Fueled by a decade of longing, it only took me a couple of hours to take my initials – TAN – turn the A into a rounded upside down horseshoe, stretch the N across it like a lightning bolt, name it the ‘Lightning-T-Horseshoe’ . . . and race to the mailbox. Though I ‘knew’ instantly, it was three weeks later before the station called, announcing . . . ‘Congratulations, Tommy, you won the pony!’

After that, everything worked out beautifully – I appeared on TV to receive my pony, we found a little barn we could use, and my father even got a promotion enabling us to stock up on plenty of hay and oats. By the time the universe had wrapped up granting me this great gift to myself, all my younger brother and I needed to do was – walk about a mile to the barn, throw the red saddle on our beautiful Shetland, and joyfully gallop around the country side – of course, flyin’ off now and again.

Looking back as a white-haired grandfather who is still sharing pony stories with my children and their children, I am happy to remind everyone that the best way to realize your dreams is to trust your inner wisdom.

I believe William Jennings Bryan had it right when he offered . . . ‘Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not to be waited for, it is to be achieved.’

Credit: Thomas N.

*Thanks Thomas! Great story.

Five Ingredients

As any farmer knows, the growth of a crop only happens when the right ingredients are present. To harvest plentiful fields, the farmer has to begin by planting the right seed in rich topsoil where sunlight and water can help the seed to sprout, mature, and bear fruit. If any of the ingredients (seeds, topsoil, sunlight, or water) are missing, the crop won’t grow.

Growing as a leader also requires the proper ingredients. Unless the right attitudes and actions are cultivated an aspiring leader will sputter and fail rather than growing in influence. Let’s look at five basic qualities essential for growth in leadership.

1. Teachability

Arrogance crowds out room for improvement. That’s why humility is the starting point for personal growth. As Erwin G. Hall said, ‘An open mind is the beginning of self-discovery and growth. We can’t learn anything new until we can admit that we don’t already know everything.’

Adopting a beginner’s mindset helps you to be teachable. Beginners are aware that they don’t know it all, and they proceed accordingly. As a general rule, they’re open and humble, noticeably lacking in the rigidity that often accompanies experience and achievement. It’s easy enough to have a beginner’s mind when you’re actually a beginner, but maintaining teachability gets trickier in the long term especially when you’ve already achieved some degree of success.

2. Sacrifice

Growth as a leader involves temporary loss. It may mean giving up familiar but limiting patterns, safe but unrewarding work, poor values you no longer believe in, or relationships that have lost their meaning. Whatever the case, everything we gain in life comes as a result of sacrificing something else. We must give up to go up.

3. Security

To keep learning throughout life, you have to be willing, no matter what your position is, to say, ‘I don’t know.’ It can be hard for executives to admit lacking knowledge because they feel as if everyone is looking to them for direction, and they don’t want to let people down their people. However, followers aren’t searching for perfection in their leaders. They’re looking for an honest, authentic, and courageous leader who, regardless of the obstacles facing the organization, won’t rest until the problem is solved.

It took me seven years to hit my stride as a communicator. During those seven years I gave some boring speeches, and I felt discouraged at times. However, I was secure enough to keep taking the stage and honing my communication skills until I could connect with an audience. Had I been insecure, then the negative evaluations of others would have sealed my fate and I never would have excelled in my career.

4. Listening

Listen, learn, and ask questions from somebody successful who has gone on before you. Borrow from their experiences so that you can avoid their mistakes and emulate their triumphs. Solicit feedback and take to heart what you’re told. The criticism of friends may seem bitter in the short-term but, when heeded; it can save you from falling victim to your blind spots.

5. Application

Knowledge has a limited shelf life. Unless used immediately or carefully preserved, it spoils and becomes worthless. Put the lessons you learn into practice so that your insights mature into understanding.

Credit: John C. M.

Thanks John, good info!

 

 

Fortune or Misfortune

One day while working out in the fields the farmer’s son fell and broke his leg. The villagers came to the farm and said, ‘My, that’s a great misfortune. Your son has broken his leg: now he can’t help you in the fields.’

The farmer said, ‘It is not a misfortune.’

A day later, the government troops came to the village looking for young men to draft into the army. They had to leave the boy behind because his leg was broken. Again, the villagers came to the farm and said, ‘My, that’s a great fortune.’

The farmer replied, ‘Yes it is a great fortune.’

Then one day the farmer’s only horse jumped the fence and ran away. The villagers came to the farm and said, ‘What a great misfortune that your horse has run away.’

The farmer said, ‘It is not a misfortune.’

Two or three days later, the horse came back with a dozen wild horses following behind him. The villagers came to him and said, ‘It’s a great fortune that your horse came back with twelve others.’

The farmer replied, ‘Yes it is a great fortune.’

You see the farmer was wise enough to know that everything that was happening had a purpose and meaning beyond the simple appearance of the event that had occurred. So many times we are trapped by the emotion of the events in our lives. Some things are bad and must be resisted; other times some awkward moments, a blessing will follow.

If you define something or an event as good or bad, you always must ask yourself ‘Good in relation to what or bad in relation to what?’

Until we decide what the event means to us there is no meaning. Once you accept this and apply it to your life, you’re free and that’s important.