Future Provisions

*Survival knowledge

One of the main reasons for studying how people survive, whether economically or physically, is to find lessons we can apply to our own lives and circumstances. For many years, economists have been predicting an economic collapse here in America. If you are one of the 93+ million Americans who are out of work, your own personal economy has already collapsed.

Now it’s time to consider how you will earn money, whether you are currently out of work. In the days of the Great Depression, it was common for grocers and landlords to provide credit to their customers. Today? That would be a rare occurrence.

Our ancestors would be sad to see their children (us) toiling over these uncertain times. This was suppose to be a land of freedom and a new start. What happened?

From the Depression, there is an abundance of stories of neighbors and church families showing up at the door, laden with bags and boxes of food for a needy family(this act of kindness now is becoming illegal in many cities). When a desperate mom was asked by her child, “Mama, what’s for dinner tonight?”, the response was, “Whatever the neighbors decide to bring us!” I wish I could imagine that happening today, but our communities and families have become so fractured over the past few decades it would be a rare event.

Perhaps the most impressive thing about the Great Depression is the ingenuity of the Americans who lived through those tough times. Many continued to find ways to earn money, even when their own circumstances were dire.

To earn money, people made homemade fudge, pies and bread and sold them. Eggs could be sold for 25 cents a dozen. If a family lived near water, they could catch and sell fish, clams and crabs(this act too is becoming more and more strict). Some families grew, picked, and sold homegrown produce, and some even started lunch truck wagons (regulation of growers are also under attack).

You could also earn money selling newspapers on the corner(almost a thing of the past). Kids earned a little extra if they were promoted to “Corner Captain”, a sort of Great Depression multi-level marketing program where a kid brought in other kids to sell papers and earned a bit extra himself(no loitering now!). Odd jobs were also a popular way of making money, washing windows, loading coal, even sewing and altering clothes(days of money under the table are wearing thin).

In every case, it was a simple matter of looking around to see what people needed, what they wanted, what made them feel good about themselves and about life.

So, what skills do you have that might offer a service during a severe economic downturn? What knowledge do you have that would be helpful, even vital, to others? What products can you produce? What skills can you teach?

Ingenuity is something which can never be stolen by thieves, confiscated by a government, or lost to flood or fire. It is possible to survive during even a newer Great Depression and there is plenty to learn from those who lived through the last one.

Find a book, read, use the internet, take notes, watch videos from people who know, from those who’ve done it. Knowledge is a good thing if used to help others. And there are plenty out there who need help.

We are all in this (and will be in the future) together; let’s help one another keep going when the SHTF!

*Thanks in more part to :Frank M.

 

Judgment Calls

*more survival tidbits

‘Young adults, people born between 1980 and 1997 (or, Millennial’s) are very different than those of us reared back in the better part of the Twentieth Century.

On the surface, some of these young people may not seem to possess skills useful to survival, but on the other hand, many of these kids are very smart and may just prove incredibly adaptable under adverse conditions.

They are an untested hypothesis—an unknown quantity.
It may serve you well to welcome them into your group if they possess the right personality, rather than the right skill set.

On the other hand, if they seem worthless and completely lost without a cell phone in their hand—they just might be.

Another judgment call.

There are those weak souls out there, often Liberal/Democratic types, who just don’t seem to have a self-preservation instinct. They oppose firearms, national defense, corporations, national borders and mandatory sentencing for violent criminals. They are very trusting souls when it comes to people they really should not trust.

These types are more concerned about their environmental impact than they are about staying alive—but maybe that’s because staying alive has never been in doubt until disaster strikes.

These people could be a terrible hindrance to your efforts. Don’t give these people critical jobs or place too much trust in them. They don’t see the world as it really is.

Given time, the nature they want to protect will chew them up and spit them out. In the meantime, you may have to deal with them.

Building your survival coalition, like friendships, takes a little work, but it’s necessary to the long-term security of you and your family.

Better to find out now which neighbors can help and which can hurt your chances of survival.

“Come together and survive.”

Credit: Frank M.

*More great thoughts from Frank M. Thanks Frank!!!

1 Cor 6:5 “I speak to your shame. Is it so, that there is not a wise man among you? no, not one that shall be able to judge between his brethren?”

1 Cor 10:15 “I speak as to wise men; judge ye what I say.”

1 Cor 6:2 “Do ye not know that the saints shall judge the world? and if the world shall be judged by you, are ye unworthy to judge the smallest matters?”

1 Cor 6:3 “Know ye not that we shall judge angels? how much more things that pertain to this life?”

1 Cor 5:13 “But them that are without God judgeth. Therefore put away from among yourselves that wicked person.”

1 Cor 2:15 “But he that is spiritual judgeth all things, yet he himself is judged of no man.”

Eph. 6:10-11 “Proving what is acceptable unto the Lord. And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.”

1 Cor 1:10 “Now I beseech you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you; but that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment.”

Heb 5:14 “But strong meat belongeth to them that are of full age, even those who by reason of use have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil.”

Depression 2018-2025

We have become a wasteful nation. We are quick to discard things, quick to rack up debt, and quick to feel like we have outgrown an item before we have even broken it in. We toss away the dinner leftovers because we get bored with them and pitch a shirt because it has lost a button.

Instead of learning the skills our parents or grandparents used to stretch a buck and make an item last, we feel like we deserve more. We pitch the item and charge our credit cards with the replacement.

But you know what we really need? Financial peace. Contentment with what we have. Freedom from the need to constantly upgrade. These are essential to survival.

Reuse things, don’t throw them out. Grandpa always told me how during the depression that there was a shortage of tires. My grandpa and his brother would always go to the local landfill, and scour for old tires to repair and reuse. They always did what they needed to just get by.

Buy wholesale.

Whether it was buying seed, flour, or parts, Grandpa always explained to me the benefits of buying wholesale, and how much money he’d save doing so. Grandpa spoke of how his parents would buy wholesale garden bulk items from town and store their large purchases in the attic.

Help your neighbors.

The years of the Great Depression forced a lot of people to help their neighbors out. Frequently, neighbors would share the produce in their gardens, assist in field work, assist with repairs, and lend machinery to one another. These steps would help people save money and make it through the Great Depression.

If anything identifies us as Americans, it’s we help and love one another!

Make goods yourself (versus paying retail). I saw how often my Grandpa and his brother would make their own hog troughs, modified wagon parts, or combine parts. By making parts themselves they’d typically save 50% off what the local implements or parts dealer would charge. It’s again another remind of how resourceful the Great Depression generation lived and another way they saved money.

We’re not trying to put businesses out of business, but in times where it’s lean for people, you have to do what you have to do!

Become allergic to debt.

For most folks today, a chunk of their income goes toward paying interest on loans and credit cards. My grandparents always talked about how people got swamped by their debt payments as farmers headed into the Depression. As a result, a lot of farmers and families lost their farms due to this burden. In addition, Grandpa always talked about how certain folks would get swamped by credit cards, and how detestable that was. Grandpa always felt like debt was a disease or virus that needed to be avoided at all costs! He talked first-hand about how his Dad lost a farm due to too much debt. The bitter taste of debt remained with him his entire life.

Face it, unless you win the lottery, you will never have large debts paid off; only the interest is paid on most loans!

When was the last time you were able to really save BIG drops of money? Start today, for go that new phone, if your old version works, and the old plan is acceptable; leave the upgrades for other people- save your money! Even a few dollars stacked on one another looks good at the end of 6 months. And share, share tips and post what you do online; the it will change your life and of those around you.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Great tips Frank, Thanks!!!

 
Lk 6:35 “But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil.”

 
Mk 12:31 “And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.”

 
Rom 15:2 “Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.”

Trust

Deciding you can trust someone isn’t always easy. On one hand, trusting the wrong people can get you killed. On the other hand, if you can’t trust anyone, you’re going to have a hell of a time surviving; like it or not, there will come a time when you’ll need help from your fellow humans. If we’re going to make it, we’re going to have to work together and trust each other.

If you have ever had your world flipped upside down and you don’t know who to trust, here are a few methods you can use in the future to determine if someone is worth your trust.

Trustworthy people are reliable with the little things. Ever been betrayed by someone only to realize how many smaller signs of shadiness you’d already let slide? Turns out, all those white lies—like how much they really spent in Vegas, or why they were always slamming their laptop shut when you came in the room—may very well be signs of bigger trouble down the road. When it comes to trusting others, if someone regularly displays small acts of honesty, he’s likely to be trustworthy with big picture issues as well (and vice versa).

A trustworthy person displays self-control. If someone can’t trust him or herself, it’s going to be nearly impossible for you to trust him. Researchers tested this theory and found that people who display high levels of self-control are perceived as more trustworthy by others – and rightfully so. If someone can’t manage their impulses in a tempting situation, it’s going to be difficult to place your trust in them. Everyone encounters temptation at some point in their lives – and how he or she reacts in those moments is the true test of character.

A trustworthy person is comfortable with compromises. Trust gets built through a series of tiny moments where our spouse or friend temporarily compromises their happiness for ours.

These instances can be as small as asking to hear about our day when they’re tired at the end of their own, or agreeing to eat something for dinner that we like but they aren’t particularly crazy about. When both people regularly engage in these behaviors, trust begins to build – if we can trust them to put the health of the relationship first on a small scale, we can trust them to do the same on a bigger scale, too.

Actions speak for themselves. When someone is constantly making excuses for their behavior or justifying their actions in retrospect, they are raising a huge red flag. Trustworthy people don’t leave room for explanations or doubts – their actions simply speak for themselves. They do what they say they’ll do, and they explain any misunderstandings or inconsistencies as they arise – not after they’ve been caught red-handed in a lie.

Trustworthy people also trust others. A recent study that examined the behaviors of video game players found that those who were comfortable relying on and cooperating with other players were less likely to betray their friends in the game. Trustworthy people understand that trust is a two-way street – they give it out and they expect it back in turn. The more suspicious someone is of others’ intentions, the more likely it is that they’re the one who can’t be trusted! (This is not always the case however, the rule but there are exceptions)

Finally, do you trust them? Perhaps the most paradoxical component of building trust is that someone’s trustworthiness is partially reliant on your trust in him or her. It’s been suggested that someone is more likely to behave in a trustworthy manner if they feel as though they are trusted.

Trust is, in many ways, a self-fulfilling prophecy.
The best way to discover if you can trust someone is to trust him or her. It will not only make you come off as a more trustworthy person, but it may make them into one.
Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Thanks Frank!!! Good info

The Mouse Trap

THE MOUSE TRAP

A mouse looked through the crack in the wall to see the farmer and his wife open a package. “What food might this contain?” the mouse wondered. He was devastated to discover it was a mousetrap.

Retreating to the farmyard, the mouse proclaimed the warning: “There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!”

The chicken clucked and scratched, raised her head and said, “Mr. Mouse, I can tell this is a grave concern to you, but it is of no consequence to me. I cannot be bothered by it.”

The mouse turned to the pig and told him, “There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!” The pig sympathized, but said, “I am so very sorry, Mr. Mouse, but there is nothing I can do about it but pray. Be assured you are in my prayers.”

The mouse turned to the cow and said, “There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!” The cow said, “Wow, Mr. Mouse. I’m sorry for you, but it’s no skin off my nose.”

So, the mouse returned to the house, head down and dejected, to face the farmer’s mousetrap alone.

That very night a sound was heard throughout the house – like the sound of a mousetrap catching its prey. The farmer’s wife rushed to see what was caught. In the darkness, she did not see it was a venomous snake whose tail the trap had caught. The snake bit the farmer’s wife. The farmer rushed her to the hospital and she returned home with a fever.

Everyone knows you treat a fever with fresh chicken soup, so the farmer took his hatchet to the farmyard for the soup’s main ingredient. But his wife’s sickness continued, so friends and neighbors came to sit with her around the clock. To feed them, the farmer butchered the pig. The farmer’s wife did not get well; she died. So many people came for her funeral, the farmer had the cow slaughtered to provide enough meat for all of them.

The mouse looked upon it all from his crack in the wall with great sadness.

Moral of the story?

So, the next time you hear someone is facing a problem and think it doesn’t concern you, remember, when one of us is threatened, we are all at risk. We are all involved in this journey called life. We must keep an eye out for one another and make an extra effort to encourage one another. Each of us is a vital thread in another person’s tapestry.

Bridges To Build

Image

Once upon a time two brothers, who lived on adjoining farms, fell into conflict. It was the first serious rift in 40 years of farming side by side, sharing machinery, and trading labor and goods as needed without a conflict.

Then the long collaboration fell apart. It began with a small misunderstanding and it grew into a major difference, and finally it exploded into an exchange of bitter words followed by weeks of silence.

One morning there was a knock on the older brother’s door. He opened it to find a man with carpenter’s tools box.

I’m looking for a few days’ work.” – he said. “Perhaps you would have a few small jobs here and there I could help with?”

Yes.” – said the older brother. “I do have a job for you. Look across the creek at that farm. That’s my neighbor; in fact, it’s my younger brother. Last week there was a meadow between us and he took his bulldozer to the river levee and now there is a creek between us. Well, he may have done this to spite me, but I’ll do him one better.”

See that pile of lumber by the barn? I want you to build me a fence –an 8-foot fence — so I won’t need to see his place or his face anymore.”

The carpenter said, “I think I understand the situation. Show me the nails and the post-hole digger and I’ll be able to do a job that pleases you.”

The older brother had to go to town, so he helped the carpenter get the materials ready and then he was off for the day.

The carpenter worked hard all that day measuring, sawing, nailing. About sunset when the farmer returned, the carpenter had just finished his job.

The farmer’s eyes opened wide, his jaw dropped. There was no fence there at all. It was a bridge — a bridge stretching from one side of the creek to the other! A fine piece of work, handrails and all — and the neighbor, his younger brother, was coming toward them, his arms outstretched — “You are quite a fellow to build this bridge after all I’ve said and done.”

The two brothers stood at each end of the bridge, and then they met in the middle, taking each other’s hand.

They turned to see the carpenter hoist his toolbox onto his shoulder.

No, wait! Stay a few days. I’ve a lot of other projects for you,” said the older brother.

Sorry, I’d love to stay on,” the carpenter said, “but I have many more bridges to build.”