Robin Hood’s Social Being

In most versions of the story, Robin Hood was a nobleman. He first got on the wrong side of the law by poaching deer off the royal hunting grounds. He responded by adopting a radical view of the government, protesting the taxes being levied to pay for the war in the Holy Land (the Crusades)

Does this taxation increase to pay for wars abroad scenario sound familiar? Seems nothing regarding wars never changes. Anyway, he banded with likewise tax resisters, survivalists, and so-called gangsters, all men, and camped in the woods. He supported the legitimate King Richard over the English government ruling in his absence, making Robin Hood a Tory.

If Robin Hood lived today, he would probably be considered extremely conservative, reading gun fanciers’ magazines (the modern equivalent of the longbow), loudly proclaiming his right to hunt, dressing in camo, driving a van, loving freedoms and just laws of the land and using the sort of political action through violence against the evil machinations of the powers that be- he would be known as a leader of a revolution, for the people, by the people and with the people. Basically appreciating and enforcing the Constitution of the U.S.

The idea that Robin Hood promoted a type of socialism seems to come from the saying “rob from the rich and give to the poor.”

That’s not exactly socialism, but it is a sort of redistributionism associated with many clans the world over. That’s not exactly what he did. Robin Hood took back that which was taken from the countryside’s people.

And, If the state isn’t on your side, you need to bribe the local state sympathizers to gain their favor so they won’t roll over on you and turn you into the supposed elected powers. Seems that some “people” know more about redistribution than those who mention the idea.

The easiest way to aid aid the people is to (take back that which was stolen from the people) distribute food to starving peasants, torture unfair task masters in front of their employees, toss bags of money out, etc.

The Australian bush rangers did that, as did pirates when they raided government/merchant ships, so did the Japanese yakuza at one time; we can put Robin Hood in the same category as well, an ultra-rightwing groups. Thumbs up for Robin Hood! True leaders must be willing to go against the grain for the sake of the less fortunate, helping those in need without a regard to repay. Not a political idealist full of lies and flattery; hypocrisy.

We ARE on the side of the underdog.

Credit in most part to Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan

BONUS VIDEO

Anchors and Mid-Line Loops

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Still On The Robin Hood Kick

Is Robin Hood a criminal or a hero?

Robin Hood is both. Translation= Robin Hood would have made a true America Hero.

He is a criminal in the eyes of the corrupted rulers of his time.

He is a hero to the town folk and the public, for distributing what should be theirs.

It can be agreed a hero is someone who regards and protects the people. It can be agreed a criminal is someone who works outside or against the set law.

It can then be agreed Robin Hood is someone who regards and protects the people, but does so in a way outside or against the set law.

A criminal is someone has committed a crime, however not all laws are moral or just. For example, the Holocaust was an official government program as was Apartheid.

Robin Hood stole from the wealthy because they gained their money unfairly because of their positions in the government. They got to keep their money because of tax exemptions, but the only way to keep the country running without removing those was to increase taxation on middle-to-lower class to outrageous levels.

By doing this Robin Hood broke the law and therefore became a criminal. Robin Hood did however become a hero of the citizens because he returned money that should have been theirs to begin with.

We need more Robin Hood-like minded people stepping up!

Credit a true patriot, Jonathan C.

Thanks Jonathan!

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Escape from plastic zip tie type police handcuffs

 

Not All Outlaws Are Bad

All outlaws were not necessarily bad men. Many were victims of a corrupt law system (similar to the one here in the U.S.), some were honest rebels against the regal status quo (politicians and their deputies of law), others were simply in the way or social outcasts (non-rich or lovers of God rather than money).

Medieval people were all firm believers in God and prayed to for deliverance and support; this would provide a degree of comfort during periods of pain or lonely isolation.

In addition to the tangible requirements for survival stated in previous posts regarding lessons from Robin Hood, there is the less tangible but most important requirement of sheer willpower if you don’t think you can survive you probably won’t survive.

The psychological effect of living outdoors for a long time on a knife-edge would wear down an outlaw’s ability to think and plan; he would be unable to react rationally to an immediate or sudden threat and any ill-considered action – or sheer panic – would sink him deeper and deeper into trouble. He would become as wild as the environment, cease to be fully human and eventually succumb.

An old survival adage from the North American Fur Trade years 1750-1840 is: Where one man can survive, two men can fare well : certainly numbers would permit support and a delegation of tasks but would also require more food from a selected catchment area(s).

In the medieval forest world there are no doctors, dentists, supermarkets, clothing outlets, friendly policemen, fast-food chains or charity shops.

To survive in the medieval forest to become like Robin Hood, one must take into account that it isn’t just about survival – you must adapt, improvise but above all overcome; take precautions, make preparations and plan ahead.

Only then will it cease to be simple survival and become a way of life but to endure the long term, you really must learn to stop roughing it, settle in, know your stuff, develop a routine, then learn to like it and want to be there. Only then do you become part of it all. And above all, count on God to supply all your needs wherever you find yourself.

“If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there.” Psalm 139:8

Credit mostly to :Jonathan C.

Thanks Jonathan!!! God Bless!

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Tactical Pen Link 

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The Fire Drill

*Still in the Sherwood Forest……?

January in Sherwood Forest was known as ‘Wolf-Month’ for a very good reason; wolf packs driven by snow or cold to shelter in the woodlands in the same way as the outlaws would become a serious threat; the wolves natural food was scarce at that time and starving animals were known to overcome their natural fear of man and enter nearby villages in an attempt to carry off livestock and on more than a few occasions even small children – grown men and horses passing through Sherwood in the medieval period are recorded as having been attacked by wolves, a wintertime hazard that remained until the 14th Century.

In one medieval example, a wolf leaped out on a horse and rider, bit off a piece of horse-rump and fled into the forest with the reeking piece of flesh before the rider realized what had happened. A small child was carried off from Linby by a wolf in the early 12th Century.

Even an armed man on foot would become a hunted quarry and possibly have to face a desperate and terrifying foe suited to the environment and equipped with deadly weapons designed for face-to-face close-combat.

A wonderful morale-booster, fires frighten animals and give off warmth and light and you can then heat your water and cook your food using it, adding a civilized aspect to living rather than just simply surviving outdoors and is what makes most folk today remember as a comfortable camp under canvas or the stars from a past outdoor experience.

Fire can be made using natural materials and is not as hard to create this way as you think if you simply have a go and practice; an everyday task which would be as natural and easy to a medieval person as tying shoelaces or switching on an electric light would be to a modern city-dweller.

Medieval people often carried flint and steel but could also recognize the correct materials for ‘making fire by rubbing two sticks together’ at a glance. This method generally falls into two categories – the fire plough or the fire drill.

Credit: Jonathan C.

P.S. We have many survival advantages Robin Hood and his Merry Men did not have. They lived before matches and other modern fire starters.

Fortunately, we live in an age when we can start a fire whenever and wherever we want.(VIDEO LINK)

VIDEO LESSON

Fresh Bow Drill (Poplar on Hazel)

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Outlaws and In-Laws

*More lessons from the days of Robin Hood

An outlaw band sheltering in woodland during Robin Hood’s day would exist almost side-by-side with local villagers and as most medieval outlaws were captured through being betrayed, it would be best to either avoid villagers altogether or at least try and stay on reasonably good terms with them.

To make the local people fear you so much that they would both provide valuable foodstuffs and not betray you to the authorities has been demonstrated enough in the past to be seen as worthless for anything beyond a few days.

The Kings deer the oft-quoted free lunch of Robin Hood and The Merry Men are of course there to be taken if you have the skills or the necessary hunting gear.

However, in addition to meat, bread is also a necessity and does not grow on trees or roam the forest glades and by eating only venison you would become sick and grow weaker on a diet of pure protein.

If you could escape or avoid the Foresters and take deer, a local villager could probably be contacted or found who would readily exchange a piece of meat for a loaf of bread, a basket of vegetables or a jug of ale.

The penalties for both if caught poaching were extremely severe in some cases amputation of fingers or hands, branding and blinding or a fine so heavy it would financially crush a man or his village for years.

Lurking outlaws themselves may have also once lived in the same village, and have relatives or friends there to help them survive and were not criminals or bad men.

The law forbade anyone to give aid, help and food to outlaws, who could be taken dead or alive by anyone for a guaranteed cash reward.

For the out-laws to move back in with the in-laws in hard times or bad weather would make good sense ; travel and news became very hard in Sherwood Forest in winter and some places would at times be simply unreachable through snow or mud, with roads and tracks simply disappearing for weeks in the rain or under snow and ice (March was known in Sherwood Forest as Mud-Month where roads and tracks became impassable for long periods ; a problem that remained in Sherwood Forest into the mid 18th Century).

If at these times you couldn’t get out of the village it meant that a threat in the form of officialdom couldn’t get in and for a time a resident outlaw amongst friends might have relative peace, a roof over his head, hot food and a welcome change of company in the form of fresh faces.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan; people are getting info and blessed. It makes sense to tell it like it is; NO MATTER WHAT!

Crayon Candle – Zombie Survival Tips #21

Thanks to my friend and brother @CRAZY RUSSIAN HACKER 

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Outlaws

Once more on Robin Hood and the survival lessons we can learn from the legends of the Merry Men in the Sherwood Forest.

Realistically, surviving a typical medieval winter in Sherwood Forest might not have been much fun as an outlaw.

If a band of medieval outlaws in Sherwood Forest managed to survive the everyday threat of being captured or killed by the forces of (crooked) law and (dis) order, their next biggest worry would be simply how to stay alive in terms of shelter and finding something to eat and drink as medieval temperatures dropped far below the winters we experience today.

The outlaws would be by necessity nomadic, moving around within an established area unsettled in terms of any permanent storage capacity and so be unable to plant and nurture any crops or vegetables.

Staying in one place for too long risked detection by the authorities. In summertime a band of men could survive by eating as hunter-gatherers like their ancestors but with the approach of autumn and as the temperature began to drop other measures would clearly have to be adopted.

To physically exist a man requires food and drink – in cold weather he would also require a suitable shelter and a source of heat.

An outlaw band planning to stay in Sherwood Forest through the winter would have to have the means to provide themselves with all four.

The problem with not having made proper provision for winter is obvious; you will meet a cold, lonely and hungry death.

Sleeping in the open after a day spent in the open is risking hypothermia and exposure, and simply freezing to death in your sleep.

Any shortages of drink and food would result in a quicker fall in energy in the short-term and in the long-term the body’s natural resistance to cold and sickness and in both the brain’s ability to reason; death could be measured in hours. But without sleep, the body cannot function naturally.

Many people are surprised when they hear that hypothermia can occur anywhere and anytime when the air temperature is below 60F /16C the body needs to maintain a core of warmth and as the core temperature drops heat is taken from the head, resulting in a drop in circulation and energy being burned to provide heat rather than to feed the brain; the brain slows down, irrational behavior gradually grows until the subject doesn’t know what they are doing.

The effect is so gradual the subject will not realize it is happening without immediate help, they will die. A slight breeze can half the time a man could expect to be in trouble through hypothermia; a cool wind can reduce it by four times that. Our outlaws would quickly have to learn two things; to stay dry and to keep out of the wind.

In prolonged daytime temperatures of below freezing, living permanently outdoors is very risky unless you know what you are about; after dark in the same conditions, you sleep with the risk that you might never wake up again.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan for all your contributions!

Cold Water Challenge – The Selection on HISTORY – How I Survived Hypothermia

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A Lesson From Robin of the Hood

A quick plot synopsis for you: King Richard the Lionheart has been out of England, waging war as part of the Crusades. He is captured and held for ransom when he attempts to return home. His brother, Prince John wants to seize the throne and be crowned king. The prince is aided and abetted by the Sheriff of Nottingham.

Robin, or Sir Robin of Locksley, is a nobleman who can’t stand by while Prince John savages the countryside, torturing the people into compliance, stealing their crops and animals and daughters, and forcing them to pay ruinous taxes.

Robin assembles a band of Merry Men, and they fight to stop oppression, killing when necessary. They also redistribute income, taking from the rich and giving to the poor.

Eventually, Richard the Lionheart returns to England, and Robin and his Merry Men are crucial to Richard’s overthrowing Prince John and returning to his throne.

And just what are the survival lessons from all this adventurous activity?
Well, first, always remember ALL your stakeholders. Robin is looking out for everyone.

He could care less about class distinctions like Normans (Prince John and his evil gang) vs. Saxons (some English nobles, but mostly the oppressed poor). Even though most of Robin’s work falls into the anti-Norman field, he’s open-minded enough (and open-hearted enough) to fall for a lovely Norman noblewoman, the Maid Marian.

Also, be a straight shooter. Robin is a straight shooter, literally and metaphorically. He tells it like it is, no matter who the audience is, no matter how dangerous the situation. He blusters his way into a banquet of Prince John’s and proceeds to call him a traitor for wanting to depose Richard. He does this while surrounded by dozens of armed men all loyal to the prince. It’s unlikely any of us will face hostile audiences who are ready, willing and able to kill, so if honesty is the best policy for Robin, it’s the best policy, period. It is amazing what good will can do for you when you earn it through honesty.

Robin is a straight shooter with bow and arrow, too. In disguise, he participates in a tournament that he knows is a trap for him. But he shoots straight and wins. Once again, he is almost killed. Once again, the Merry Men help him escape. If you insist on being completely honest in every and any situation, you will find it useful to have the Merry Men around to help you escape tight places. If you don’t have any Merry Men available, be sure to have an executable exit strategy.

Robin succeeds at communicating in this straightforward style because he’s passionate about his mission and he communicates that passion to everyone he meets. The lesson here is obvious; Enjoy what you do.

For crying out loud, Robin’s gang is called the Merry Men. They spend inordinate amounts of time laughing and singing while they steal from the rich and give to the poor. How amazing is it a bunch of men enjoy stealing from much richer men and getting away with it? It’s almost beyond belief amazing. If the Merry Men’s mission is to steal from the rich and give to the poor, they have absolutely no profit. None. Zero. But they pursue the mission with astounding zeal, gleefully giving away all their stolen riches (their profits). They pursue their mission at the risk of life and limb, living at poverty levels in the forest.

If you can get people to enjoy the work at hand, they will put up with many things to accomplish the mission. They’ll even enjoy it.

And, you won’t have to give up all your profits the way the Merry Men did.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*As always, thanks Jonathan!!!

*Great analogy! Always liked Robin Hood. Could use a few people like that in the world. Possibly, quit possibly; they’re already near.

1 Tim 6:17 “Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy; …

Acts 20:35 “I have shewed you all things, how that so labouring ye ought to support the weak, and to remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he said, It is more blessed to give than to receive.

Mt 19:21 “Jesus said unto him, If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come and follow me.

Lk 14:13 “But when thou makest a feast, call the poor, the maimed, the lame, the blind: …