Common Knowledge

Electronics. Freeze Drying. Material Sciences. Today’s modern-day technologies have made being prepared for short-term and long-term survival easier than ever. Unfortunately, electronics need a constant energy source, freeze dried food is not always on hand, and lightweight materials eventually wear out.

Note: In the event of and EMP (Electro-magnetic pulse) due to a localized nuke, and or a created pulse – your electronic phone, lap top, PC, etc will not work AT ALL. Alternate means of survival and communications are preferred.’

Though today’s sciences have made survival easier, it would behoove us all to keep in mind the survival skills learned and implemented by our forefathers.

A group of resilient individuals who were skilled at surviving the harsh elements with little rations and supplies were the men who fought during the American Civil War: both Union and Confederate.

During this time, a world run on electricity was left to the realm of science fiction. The men on the front lines during the various battles had not computers, GPS, or digital anything. It was an analog world. Even though this sounds archaic in today’s hi-tech world, the durability of a brass and clockwork world has extended to modern times; whereas, many electronics do not last longer than a few years.

Learning to use an analog compass could be one of the most important skills you could acquire.

Additionally, an analog watch would be another common tool that our forefathers carried. The most common style was of course a pocket watch, but a wristwatch works just fine. What is important is the fact the watch is a wind up and does not rely on batteries to operate. There are many wind up watches from the Civil War era that are still in use today. All you do is remember to wind it up every day and you are set.

Tools should not be the only focus when looking for survival tips from the past. Food is another important aspect of survival and again we can look to the rations of the Civil War soldier for ideas. The Confederates and the Federals had very similar diets in the beginning, which consisted primarily of salted pork and dry goods such as beans and rice.

Two main staples of a soldier’s diet were hardtack and desiccated potatoes. Hardtack is a type of hard, dry biscuit made from flour, salt, and water. The ingredients are mixed together and slowly baked until hard. The shelf life of these little briquettes was remarkable so long as they were kept dry.

It was even rumored the U.S. issued hardtack made during the Civil War to soldiers fighting in the Spanish American War.

Another food item soldiers were issued were desiccated potatoes. Once again, the starch laden food was relatively cheap to come by and seemed to have kept the men feeling full. Desiccated is simply another word for dehydrated for all intents and purposes. The potatoes were thinly sliced and dried until all the moisture was removed and the slices were no longer pliable. Like hardtack, desiccated potatoes have an incredible shelf life.

When it came time to eat both, they were commonly boiled in broth or in water with salt pork until the potatoes or the biscuit became tender.

It is common knowledge the most versatile modern-day material is the polyethylene tarp. These tarps can be used as a shelter, water collector, ground cover, or rain fly. Just has the polyethylene has a variety of uses so does its ancestor, the canvas tarp.

The canvas tarp can be used for everything a polyethylene tarp, plus a few extras. Canvas tarps are better suited than polyethylene to fashion replacement packs or totes to carry supplies.

Canvas tarps are also better for being turned into ponchos, jackets, and other clothing items. During the Civil War, it was common to draw field maps on canvas instead of paper because of its water resistance and durability.

There is no doubt modern technology has made survival and emergency preparedness much easier. However, this does not mean should not look to the past for tips and techniques for successful survival.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Thanks Frank!!

Top 10 Survival Tips

Basic Survival Skills (LINK)

Are We There Yet?

Photo/artwork by: http://ddees.com 

Have you noticed, since the September 11th attacks and particularly in the last two Presidential (s)election cycles, some strange goings-on?

Have you noticed how almost all mainstream media and political figures indict foreign leaders, support questionable foreign non-state actors, or assert “red lines” in foreign affairs, without evidence given or requested?

Or perhaps you’ve observed how political media outlets regularly cover the media industry by addressing transparently partisan and petty criticisms as serious but ignoring or marginalizing substantive criticisms because of “industry realities?”

Have you seen how almost all political figures and media citing public dissatisfaction with vague descriptions of the prevailing order (“establishment,” “business as usual,” “Washington politicians,” “DC polls,”) without investigation of what or who comprises that order?

It feels a lot to me like we are living in an increasingly incompetent deep state.

Are we?

In a simple sense, of course there is a deep state. People in similar work have similar ideas, socialize together, form relationships and have experiences in common. This is especially true if your work includes unique experiences like making decisions that affect the lives of millions of people. There are not many people able to understand what this involves. There will be more cohesion and commonality among those in government than the structure of the formal institutions would suggest.

But the formal institutional structure of the US is extremely robust. It’s almost impossible for a group outside of, or spanning across, the formal institutions to carry out a plan on any scale. There are secrets, and there are conspiracies, but there are just as many forces working to contain them as to carry them through. The US has a very good record, in the end, of bringing secrets to light and dealing with those who conspire against its institutions from within.

Most people simply do not care very much about federal politics, especial foreign policy( discretely controlled by Israel) . To the extent they take any notice, they are overly cynical about the reality and overly optimistic about the scope for change.

Remember, we’re all in this together,

Credit: Derek P.

*Thanks Derek!!

BONUS HELPFUL INFO!

Top 10 Survival Skills You Need to Know

The following video contains means to defend oneself.

Household Items That Can Save Your Life During Civil Chaos (LINK)

 

 

Faith & Fortitude

Since the two most dramatic “events” in recent human history happened less than 100 years ago, it’s easy to find inspiring survival stories that could teach us a thing or two about being more prepared. Many of those stories depict the characters as being downright lucky but, then again, luck is always on the side of those who are strong, prepared but moreover; faith in God to get you where you need to be is what wins the day.

Welsh private, Robert Phillips, after being captured by the Germans during World War I, pretended to be a musician so he would not have to dig coal with the other prisoners under brutal conditions. When he finally escaped, he used the survival skills learned in the army to get to Holland. He only traveled during the night, he used the stars to navigate, and he managed to find food along the way.

One brave Australian nurse, Rachel Pratt has won my respect and admiration. On July 4th, 1917, while taking care of injured soldiers as usual, her location was bombed. The resulting debris left her back and shoulder injured. The amazing part was that she continued to do her job until she literally collapsed on the floor and had to be transported to England.

There are dozens of such stories and they all teach the same, invaluable lesson. Whatever your situation, never give up- keep the faith and muster every ounce of fortitude. Even if the odds are against you, even without your stockpile, your bug out bag or your gun, you can still survive.

Credit :Frank M.

***Thanks Frank; appreciate your contribution!

What is Your Prepper Resume? (LINK)

Insights After the Ukraine War

The war in Ukraine is a tragic event but it’s one we can all learn from. Nothing provides as much valuable information as real world situations where ordinary people are forced to deal with extraordinary events. At the end of the day, the war in Ukraine gives us plenty of examples of what works and what doesn’t, and while personal experience is important, the wise person learns from other people’s mistakes so as not to repeat them himself.

What can we learn from these civilians living in war zones?

Maybe the most obvious lesson to be learned is there’s simply no surviving against an occupation force when facing them as an individual or small group.

Houses, towns and even entire cities can eventually get surrounded and overpowered given greater tech, weapons and a people that lack skills and faith to overcome.

A single house or compound represents a laughable resistance to organized armed forces, let alone ones with artillery and air support at their disposal. Once shooting at your position is no longer fun, they’ll just blow you up. It’s as simple as that.

Artillery and infantry beat survivalist hero fantasies. Every. Single. Time. Last resort: Escape with your life, cut your losses and move to “per se” higher ground; live to fight another day scenario.

In various parts of eastern Ukraine, people are suffering- the lack of water, electricity and food shortages. The lesson is, prepare to always cover the basics, food, water, shelter and medicines; if not for yourself, for others. There will always be people who walk in less degrees of faith and supplies than yourself.

You need to store food (somewhere), food requiring no refrigeration and little or no cooking. You need water, not just a water filter (which you should have as well) but actual jugs of water.

For true emergencies and survival situations, just like you can’t have too much food you can’t have too much water. Have a well, have a river, if nothing else keep an eye out for large barrels on sale and keep some full of water. Even the jugs for carrying water become valuable.

Have a good supply of medicines: ibuprofen, vomit and diarrhea medicine, liquid ibuprofen for children, bandages, diapers, formula, antibiotics and anointing oil (see Mk 16:18 w/Jas 5:14 if you can believe!). Antibiotics are the difference between life and death when you need them.

Have lanterns, flashlights and lots of batteries. Get an emergency crank radio. Cell phones can be tracked, so ditch the phone when you can. Have alternative means of cooking and heating. A wood burning stove may do the trick, but make sure you always keep extra wood stored for emergencies.

Maybe you’re lucky enough to still have power, if so an electric burner can be put to good use then, saving other fuels for when power goes out. Have extra fuel in storage for your vehicle, enough to make it to your potential bug out location in case you need to leave in a hurry. Have a tent and sleeping bags. These can be used not only for sleeping in tents, but also if you happen to find yourself in a refugee camp (not FEMA camps- we want to avoid those places) during winter or in an unfurnished flat after evacuation or if you’re staying with friends or family.

In a shelled city, underground is the only safe place to be, to some extent at least. An actual bunker would be ideal, but people try finding shelter anywhere underground. In buildings, windows and doors are covered with sandbags and people sleep in the interior room away from exterior walls and windows. Windows never survive shelling. The broken glass makes it impossible to stay warm in winter. Plastic sheeting can sometimes be used to close openings and still allow light in, but this is far from an ideal solution and the loss of heat is substantial.

Another hard lesson is don’t get involved. From a survival perspective, the best way to go about conflicts which can develop into violent clashes is to not get involved in the first place. Avoid going to protests and marches; they have NEVER produced any results (worth mentioning).

This is especially true in cases such as the one of Ukraine, where people are seen on one side or the other during protests and clashes, often filmed.

Something as simple as a rival remembering your face from the rallies can land you in jail or worse. In this kind of situation, it’s even neighbors, former friends and coworkers that may remember your political affiliation. They may end up mentioning your name to the new authorities and they will come after you.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan!!! Good advice.

 

How To Make A Marine Corps Fighting Hole 2.0

 

Awesome Thanks to Corporal Kelly of Corporal’s Corner. Thanks my friend! Semper Fi!!

Every War

“War is not something we talk about much; but many

in the United States have their own battles. Thing is

their battle is our battle too. One day, we will realize

we are all in this together. ”


*Survival tidbit

It is always the civilian population who suffers the most in every armed conflict. Having fought myself in two wars and having witnessed the suffering of the civilian population with my own eyes here are the do’s and the don’ts when it comes to surviving the war as a civilian.

First of all, don’t think you can survive a war by being hidden in your basement with a two-year supply of food and water. You must be mobile.

If the war comes to your hometown, then flee! The further away from the fighting you are, the better. If you are sitting on thousands of dollar’s worth of survival meals in the basement of your cozy home, you’ll probably make the wrong decision and want to stay.

Go to the cities! (Unless you sense martial law will be enacted in the cities) otherwise, the more people around you the better the chances of surviving. Many people means many witnesses. That does not mean there are exceptions but there are at present, more of us then them. Under normal situations enemy soldiers and criminal gangs are less inclined to kill you just for the fun of it.

If you stay in the countryside, you’ll be fair game for everybody: Marauding soldiers, criminals and gov’t-owned militias will make your life hell, even if there is no fighting going on. However, the judgment to go into the bush is up to your discernment.

Don’t take a gun with you! At least where others can see you are armed. Be discrete. Some people will perceive you as a threat and while criminals will more likely kill you than without a gun, the enemy will execute you for being an irregular insurgent or potential terrorist. Again, it’s a judgment call.

Take some cigarettes with you, even if you don’t smoke. Sharing a smoke with an enemy soldier at a checkpoint or a crook who is thinking about robbing can defuse the situation.

Cigarettes, antibiotics, soap, weapons and morphine (other pain drugs) are alternative currencies in many wars. While your cash might become worthless the value of these three items is growing the longer the war goes on. Especially morphine is very demanded as there will be a lot of wounded people, but also many drug addicts who will swap their food in exchange for the (a) drug.

Don’t wear fancy stuff. Leave your expensive clothes at home and dress something simple. You don’t want to get noticed, so don’t dress in bright colors. But don’t wear any military clothes or camouflage as you might be mistaken for a soldier. There is a place for camo; you should know when to and when not to appear in camo clothing.

You will have to walk a lot, so get yourself a comfortable pair of shoes.

Information is very important. Take a cheap shortwave radio with you to find out where the front lines are and where food and shelter can be found. If refugee camps (for the people by the people) have been set up, then go there. The living conditions in these camps are often horrible, but they’ll offer you security.

You might get separated from your family or friends. Designate places where you can reunite (set a time also) with them or where you can leave messages for each other.

Every war is different and a lot of things that you must do are depending on the situation. For example, you might also want to take things like maps, knives, torches(flashlights) or a first-aid kit with you.

In the end, what will be much more important than any physical item that can be carried around will be your mindset: The willingness to leave everything behind, to swallow your pride, to hide your feelings and to carry on.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks my friend Jonathan!!!

Where There is a Spark, There’s Fire

There is a primal link between man and fire. Everyone should know how to start one.

A survivor knows how to start one without matches. It’s an essential survival skill. You never know when you’ll find yourself in a situation where you’ll need a fire, but you don’t have matches. Maybe your single engine plane goes down while you’re flying over the Alaskan wilderness, like the kid in Hatchet. Or perhaps you’re out camping and you lose your backpack in a tussle with a bear. It need not be something as dramatic as these situations — even extremely windy or wet conditions can render matches virtually uselessly.

Whether you ever need to call upon these skills, it’s still just friggin’ cool to know you can start a fire, whenever and wherever you are.

Friction-based fire making is not for the faint of heart. It’s probably the most difficult of all the non-match methods. There are different techniques you can use to make a fire with friction, but the most important aspect is the type of wood you use for the fire board and spindle.

The spindle is the stick you’ll use to spin to create the friction between it and the fireboard. If you create enough friction between the spindle and the fireboard, you can create an ember that can be used to create a fire. Cottonwood, juniper, aspen, willow, cedar, cypress, and walnut make the best fire board and spindle sets.

Before you can use wood to start a friction based fire, the wood must be bone dry. If the wood isn’t dry, you’ll have to dry it out first.

The hand drill method is the most primitive, the most primal, and the most difficult to do All you need is wood, tireless hands, and some gritty determination. Therefore, it’ll put more hair on your chest than any other method. Here’s how it’s done:

Build a tinder nest. Your tinder nest will be used to create the flame you get from the spark you’re about to create. Make a tinder nest out of anything that catches fire easily, like dry grass, leaves, and bark.

Make your notch. Cut a v-shaped notch into your fire board and make a small depression adjacent to it.

Place bark underneath the notch. The bark will be used to catch an ember from the friction between the spindle and fireboard.

Start spinning. Place the spindle into the depression on your fire board. Your spindle should be about 2 feet long for this to work properly. Maintain pressure on the board and start rolling the spindle between your hands, running them quickly down the spindle. Keep doing this until an ember is formed on the fireboard.

Start a fire! Once you see a glowing ember, tap the fire board to drop your ember onto the piece of bark. Transfer the bark to your nest of tinder. Gently blow on it to start your flame.

The bow drill is probably the most effective friction based method to use because it’s easier to maintain the speed and pressure you need to create enough friction to start a fire. In addition to the spindle and fireboard, you’ll also need a socket and a bow.

Get a socket. The socket is used to put pressure on the other end of the spindle as you’re rotating it with the bow. The socket can be a stone or another piece of wood. If you use another piece of wood, try to find a harder piece than what you’re using for the spindle. Wood with sap and oil are good as it creates a lubricant between the spindle and the socket.

Make your bow. The bow should be the same length as your arm. Use a flexible piece of wood that has a slight curve. The string of the bow can be anything. A shoelace, rope, or strip of rawhide works great. Just find something that won’t break.

String up your bow and you’re ready to go.

Prepare the fireboard. Cut a v-shaped notch and create a depression adjacent to it in the fireboard. Underneath the notch, place your tinder.

String up the spindle. Catch the spindle in a loop of the bow string. Place one end of the spindle in the fireboard and apply pressure on the other end with your socket.

Start sawing. Using your bow, start sawing back and forth.

You’ve basically created a rudimentary mechanical drill. The spindle should be rotating quickly. Keep sawing until you create an ember.

Make your fire. Drop the ember into the tinder nest and blow on it gently. You got yourself a fire.

Remember, we’re all in this together,

Credit: Derek P.

Thanks Derek!!!

 

 

Survive Tools/Knowledge

It’s one thing to prepare for a temporary disaster like an earthquake or hurricane. It’s a whole other game to prepare for a long-term disaster that cripples the power grid, communication systems, and transportation networks. Without those, we’d basically be living in the 1800’s again. To coin an adage, “it’s not a matter of if, but when.” Whether it’s man-made or nature made, disaster is around many corners. If you’re not listening to God, better get some skills; well, get some skills anyway, if not for yourself, for those around you.

Back in the day, things were very different. People were more hands-on. To get through day-to-day life, they needed all sorts of skills that many people have never even heard of. These skills were so commonplace that they were often take for granted. The average pioneer may have thought, “How could anyone not know how to make soap?”

The modern world has made life so easy there’s simply no need to learn pioneer skills. But if we face a big enough disaster, this will change fast. We’ll discuss some of these lost survival skills which are worth learning if you really want to be prepared for the end of the world as we know it. If your ancestors could to learn these skills, then so can you.

Sewing clothing by hand is going to be the norm after shopping malls and department stores become a thing of the past. You’ll need to know how to use a needle and thread. Additionally, you’ll need to know how to sew buttons and apply patches to clothing as needed.

Knitting is another useful skill you’ll want to have. Without clothing stores, you’ll need to know how to knit socks, hats and fluffy sweaters. Especially in the winter. Another benefit of knitting is the ability to make clothes that you can barter for the things you need.

Making soap will come in handy when your supply of soap runs out or is destroyed. You don’t want to risk your health by not being able to wash your hands regularly. Plus, you’ll feel much more comfortable if you can clean yourself every now and then. Fortunately, soap making is a skill that anyone can learn.

Fire starting without matches or a lighter is one of the most important skills you can learn. Lighters and matches are going to run out eventually, so you need to know how to start a fire without them. Start learning some of the primitive methods for starting a fire and how to keep it burning for hours without going out.

Candle making that uses animal fats, oils or beeswax will ensure you always have light. Your candle making ability will also give you plenty of candles to barter with.

*shared info

Do You Have What it Takes to Survive? Take the quiz now (LINK) 

Recommended (purchase) to add to your bug out bag below!

Survival Spark Magnesium Survival Fire Starter with Compass and Whistle (LINK) 

I’d rather be ready (for the sake of others) and not need to be, than to need to be ready only to find out it’s too late. What seems stupid to do now maybe very wise looking in the days/years ahead. We all want “peace”, but this is earth, and peace the world’s way only leads to bondage and your freedoms taken away; until true peace from God comes to earth, be ready, be wise as serpents and harmless as doves (Mt 10:16); stupid can happen really fast and without warning, you may be called to do things you are not ready, not trained or believe in doing.

Have faith in God, but be aware of the evil of the day (we should not be ignorant of his devices or the people that do his bidding)- We are in this together- it’s not all about you; your neighbors are all around you and they need your help, they need you to know, they need you to stand in the gap; they need your love. Evil, it’s still in the world and has not plans to leave anytime soon.

Jn 15:18 “If the world hate you, ye know that it hated me before it hated you.”

Jn 15:19 “If ye were of the world, the world would love his own: but because ye are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hateth you.”

Jn 17:14 “I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.”

1 Jn 3:13 “Marvel not, my brethren, if the world hate you. ”

Jn 14:27 “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.”