Common Knowledge

Electronics. Freeze Drying. Material Sciences. Today’s modern-day technologies have made being prepared for short-term and long-term survival easier than ever. Unfortunately, electronics need a constant energy source, freeze dried food is not always on hand, and lightweight materials eventually wear out.

Note: In the event of and EMP (Electro-magnetic pulse) due to a localized nuke, and or a created pulse – your electronic phone, lap top, PC, etc will not work AT ALL. Alternate means of survival and communications are preferred.’

Though today’s sciences have made survival easier, it would behoove us all to keep in mind the survival skills learned and implemented by our forefathers.

A group of resilient individuals who were skilled at surviving the harsh elements with little rations and supplies were the men who fought during the American Civil War: both Union and Confederate.

During this time, a world run on electricity was left to the realm of science fiction. The men on the front lines during the various battles had not computers, GPS, or digital anything. It was an analog world. Even though this sounds archaic in today’s hi-tech world, the durability of a brass and clockwork world has extended to modern times; whereas, many electronics do not last longer than a few years.

Learning to use an analog compass could be one of the most important skills you could acquire.

Additionally, an analog watch would be another common tool that our forefathers carried. The most common style was of course a pocket watch, but a wristwatch works just fine. What is important is the fact the watch is a wind up and does not rely on batteries to operate. There are many wind up watches from the Civil War era that are still in use today. All you do is remember to wind it up every day and you are set.

Tools should not be the only focus when looking for survival tips from the past. Food is another important aspect of survival and again we can look to the rations of the Civil War soldier for ideas. The Confederates and the Federals had very similar diets in the beginning, which consisted primarily of salted pork and dry goods such as beans and rice.

Two main staples of a soldier’s diet were hardtack and desiccated potatoes. Hardtack is a type of hard, dry biscuit made from flour, salt, and water. The ingredients are mixed together and slowly baked until hard. The shelf life of these little briquettes was remarkable so long as they were kept dry.

It was even rumored the U.S. issued hardtack made during the Civil War to soldiers fighting in the Spanish American War.

Another food item soldiers were issued were desiccated potatoes. Once again, the starch laden food was relatively cheap to come by and seemed to have kept the men feeling full. Desiccated is simply another word for dehydrated for all intents and purposes. The potatoes were thinly sliced and dried until all the moisture was removed and the slices were no longer pliable. Like hardtack, desiccated potatoes have an incredible shelf life.

When it came time to eat both, they were commonly boiled in broth or in water with salt pork until the potatoes or the biscuit became tender.

It is common knowledge the most versatile modern-day material is the polyethylene tarp. These tarps can be used as a shelter, water collector, ground cover, or rain fly. Just has the polyethylene has a variety of uses so does its ancestor, the canvas tarp.

The canvas tarp can be used for everything a polyethylene tarp, plus a few extras. Canvas tarps are better suited than polyethylene to fashion replacement packs or totes to carry supplies.

Canvas tarps are also better for being turned into ponchos, jackets, and other clothing items. During the Civil War, it was common to draw field maps on canvas instead of paper because of its water resistance and durability.

There is no doubt modern technology has made survival and emergency preparedness much easier. However, this does not mean should not look to the past for tips and techniques for successful survival.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Credit: Frank M.

*Thanks Frank!!

Top 10 Survival Tips

Basic Survival Skills (LINK)

Basic Human Skills

Well, it’s Saturday! Hope yours is or has gone well. Kind of hot here, expecting showers tomorrow. As some may know, I hate today’s technology. Exceptions of course for WordPress and a smooth running lap top (smiles). But I feel that many of us have traded one seemingly social behavior for another. And that cannot lead to anything good. I remember a time (maybe you do to) when there were no computers, cell phones, etc; I remember a time when it was safe for both parties involved to walk down the street and ASK a neighbor if you could use their phone (land line) to call home to tell mom you’ll be a tad late or for road assistance. And….it seemed like I was just happier. It just doesn’t work like that much anymore. 😦

Ahh, my good ol’ days. Anyway, I believe in keeping tech under control. Being its master and not it being yours. Sadly today, some would rather die (not joking!) than to be without their iPod, cell phone or that new plasma TV. Somewhere along the line we need to re-evaluate our lifestyle and take back our power and control and stop letting the commercials about the newest cell phone or gadget dominate our relationships, even our very lives. Oh! and what if one day, someone “flicks” the “off” switch and turns off the machine (internet,cellular waves)…powergrid goes down? (it will one day ya know?) What will some people do?

With all this said, I’d like to offer this piece below from Jonathan C.” –Moraldiplomat

BASIC HUMAN SKILLS

‘Technology has made life easier because we don’t have to use our brains for all the small stuff, but it turns out that some of that small stuff is worth doing. Breaking away from technology makes things surprisingly easier sometimes.

What are some basic human skills we have lost to technology?

Here’s one; mental math. When was the last time you calculated something without a calculator? You can download a calculator for your phone that specializes in just about anything—from calculating a tip to splitting a check. Basically, you never have to use your brain to calculate anything if you don’t want to.

Mental math is by no means required to survive in the world, but being able to do a few basic calculations in your head makes life a lot easier.

Spelling is also a skill we’ve given up to technology. Spellcheck and auto-correct have turned me into a spelling idiot. When I’m writing by hand or typing on something that doesn’t have Spellcheck I sometimes stop mid-sentence looking at a really pedestrian word thinking, “that looks weird. Is that really how you spell that?”

To get these skills back, the best thing you can do is handcuff yourself a little.

The next time you’re trying to figure out a tip, leave the calculator in your pocket. Personally, I also spend a little time practicing mental math in weird ways. While I’m driving, I’ll mentally calculate when I’ll arrive somewhere by calculating my speed and the distance to my destination. When I fill up the tank I’ll calculate my miles per gallon. When I’m cooking, I’ll skip Google and figure out ratios on my own.

The more you do it, the quicker you’ll become.’

Credit: Jonathan C.

Thanks Jonathan, A true Patriot.

Related and Link of interest <

Phil 4:8Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.”

HAVE A GREAT SATURDAY….LEAVE THE CELL HOME TONIGHT 😉 CAN YOU??? GOD BLESS!

 

 

 

 

 

She Went An Entire Year Without The Internet…

SPECIAL POST

Well, LOL! I received this article recently and thought to listen to this testimony/experience rather and found it intriguing. I thought it important enough to share here which I often don’t reprint things of this nature; however, seeing how I can remember when their were no cell phones, no computers, no tech of really anything to speak of; it was a life different than today- a world that seemed a little more stable. I mean what would you or I do if somewhere down the road, the lights went off forever? What would people do if say the web/net switch was flipped off; and the net or web was no longer part of your life? With that said, I hope this inspires you……and you inspiring others. “- Moraldiplomat

Written by: Off The Grid Radio

“Imagine going an entire year without using the Internet – no Facebook, no Twitter, no YouTube, no email. Not even Google or Amazon.

Sound impossible?

Perhaps it is for some, but this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio did just that – and she learned a lot from the experiment. Her name is Esther Emery, a modern-day homesteader who spent 365 days away from the World Wide Web. She even got rid of her smart phone!

Emery discovered things that nearly all of us – those who spend regular time on the Internet — miss each day of the week.

Emery, whose book What Falls From The Sky details those 12 months, tells us:

-Why she decided to spend a year away from the Internet.
-How long it took before she no longer craved it.
-What traditional old-time activities she learned to love during those months.
-How the experiment dramatically changed how she views the Internet.
-Finally, Emery shares with us what she discovered – lessons that can’t be learned while staring at a bright screen.

We were inspired by her story … and we think you will be, too!

Click here to listen to this week’s interview.

HUMAN BEING vs HUMAN HAVING

body_human

So often we try to create our identity with what we have, with our possessions and our position, yet our identity is actually created by our behavior, by what we do and more importantly by how we do what we do. What really matters is not what you have got or the position that you hold, but who you are and how you behave.

We have become a society where we tend to measure a persons status by their possessions and their position. We no longer measure them by their contribution to society. This has created an enormous pressure to constantly flaunt the trappings of “success” the material things that create the impression of status.

blessed

Yet the very drive to constantly acquire the trappings of “success” creates a problem. The problem of spending money that you don’t have, to buy things that you don’t need, so that you can impress people that you don’t like.

This leads to constant insecurity, firstly can I afford these things and secondly, what if someone gets something bigger, better, faster, brighter. You sacrifice your peace of mind for the illusion of material comfort and power.

wilde

We have to learn to do more with less. Realize that your personality is more important than your possessions. Realize that what you do is more important than what you’ve got. Realize that how you do what you do is more important than what you do.

things

Your actions have a greater influence on your reputation than the position you hold or the possessions you accumulate. The one thing that you take with you where ever you go, is you. Make sure that you are worth taking along. Realize that all possessions and positions are transient, here today gone tomorrow. Think of all the changes that have already taken place in your life. The only constant is “you”.

brag

So choose to “Be a ‘Human Being’ instead of a ‘Human Having‘”.

Matthew 19:24 “And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God. ”

James 2:5 “Hearken, my beloved brethren, Hath not God chosen the poor of this world rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he hath promised to them that love him?

Value of Knowledge

value of knowledge

A giant ship engine failed. The ship’s owners tried one expert after another, but none of them could figure but how to fix the engine.

Then they brought in an old man who had been fixing ships since he was a young.

He carried a large bag of tools with him, and when he arrived, he immediately went to work. He inspected the engine very carefully, top to bottom.

Two of the ship’s owners were there, watching this man, hoping he would know what to do.

After looking things over, the old man reached into his bag and pulled out a small hammer. He gently tapped something.

Instantly, the engine lurched into life. He carefully put his hammer away.

The engine was fixed!
A week later, the owners received a bill from the old man for ten thousand dollars.

What?!” the owners exclaimed. “He hardly did anything!”

So they wrote the old man a note saying, “Please send us an itemized bill.

The man sent a bill that read:

Tapping with a hammer…… …… ……… $ 2.00
Knowing where to tap……… …… ……… $ 9,998.00

Moral of the story?

Effort is important, but knowing where to make an effort makes all the difference! Learn a trade; learn from your elders. learn that technology is the enemy…At the end of the day when all technology has given all it has, seeing we have nothing but recycled versions of the same thing and everything has been done and all our tech has finally done all the damage it could be conceived in men and now has been silenced- all that remains is the value of knowledge to start anew. Learn the old ways; “Chance favors the prepared mind.”

Seek wisdom! Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting tomatoes in a fruit salad. 😉