Outlaws

Once more on Robin Hood and the survival lessons we can learn from the legends of the Merry Men in the Sherwood Forest.

Realistically, surviving a typical medieval winter in Sherwood Forest might not have been much fun as an outlaw.

If a band of medieval outlaws in Sherwood Forest managed to survive the everyday threat of being captured or killed by the forces of (crooked) law and (dis) order, their next biggest worry would be simply how to stay alive in terms of shelter and finding something to eat and drink as medieval temperatures dropped far below the winters we experience today.

The outlaws would be by necessity nomadic, moving around within an established area unsettled in terms of any permanent storage capacity and so be unable to plant and nurture any crops or vegetables.

Staying in one place for too long risked detection by the authorities. In summertime a band of men could survive by eating as hunter-gatherers like their ancestors but with the approach of autumn and as the temperature began to drop other measures would clearly have to be adopted.

To physically exist a man requires food and drink – in cold weather he would also require a suitable shelter and a source of heat.

An outlaw band planning to stay in Sherwood Forest through the winter would have to have the means to provide themselves with all four.

The problem with not having made proper provision for winter is obvious; you will meet a cold, lonely and hungry death.

Sleeping in the open after a day spent in the open is risking hypothermia and exposure, and simply freezing to death in your sleep.

Any shortages of drink and food would result in a quicker fall in energy in the short-term and in the long-term the body’s natural resistance to cold and sickness and in both the brain’s ability to reason; death could be measured in hours. But without sleep, the body cannot function naturally.

Many people are surprised when they hear that hypothermia can occur anywhere and anytime when the air temperature is below 60F /16C the body needs to maintain a core of warmth and as the core temperature drops heat is taken from the head, resulting in a drop in circulation and energy being burned to provide heat rather than to feed the brain; the brain slows down, irrational behavior gradually grows until the subject doesn’t know what they are doing.

The effect is so gradual the subject will not realize it is happening without immediate help, they will die. A slight breeze can half the time a man could expect to be in trouble through hypothermia; a cool wind can reduce it by four times that. Our outlaws would quickly have to learn two things; to stay dry and to keep out of the wind.

In prolonged daytime temperatures of below freezing, living permanently outdoors is very risky unless you know what you are about; after dark in the same conditions, you sleep with the risk that you might never wake up again.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan for all your contributions!

Cold Water Challenge – The Selection on HISTORY – How I Survived Hypothermia

*Thanks to Survival Lilly for all her informative videos – Subscribe and support Lilly!!! 🙂

Red Dawn Scenario

*Survival tidbit

Successful first wave attacks at different times of history have arrived sometimes disguised as something else (such as a real life “Trojan Horse” from ancient Greek writings) or simply have been a complete surprise to the public (the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941).

What avenues could a “Trojan Horse” strike the U.S. and disguise first wave attacks?

Let’s consider the following;

-Cargo Ships that are carrying surface to air missiles, helicopters, tanks, and even troops.

-Cruise Lines that are also carrying weapons, missiles, and troops.

-Commercial jets flying in to the U.S. from overseas (the plot from the first “Red Dawn” from the early 1980s where a first wave attack was launched by Russia and allies and disguised as inbound commercial jets).

-Foreign Exchange “Students” (some of these foreign exchange students, many who are here from China, may not be here just for a college degree — they may be here awaiting “orders”).

Which brings us to attacks from forces already in the US.
If you’re going to set up a new government once the first government falls, why obliterate standing and operational government buildings when you can simply take them?

With millions of illegal immigrants within our borders, and tens of millions more of “legal” immigrants and non-U.S. citizens, such as international “business owners”, foreign “diplomats” and foreign “exchange students”, it’s not a stretch of the imagination to see a first wave attack including highly trained foreign special forces soldiers and foreign “secret agents” planted here for that purpose.

The international spy game is alive and well and every country has its own form of CIA, MI6, and KGB (now called the FSB), and it may not be that difficult to plant foreign agents at various levels of government and even within the U.S. military.

My bet is any scheme for an attack and takeover of the U.S. will include widespread distribution of foreign agents (China-Russia,possibly also Mexican) within U.S. borders, which has probably already taken place. And the more years that pass, the more likely these agents can get deeply entrenched into U.S. life, businesses, government, and military.

Finally, many of these foreign agents may be currently turning real U.S. citizens into “double agents” (by lies, money, or by coercion) who turn on their homeland to support a new government and new rule of law- true regime change; is it coming the America?

Credit: Derek P.

Thanks Derek. Good warning. I’ve thought that the Red Dawn Scenario was (possible) going to be the end of the USA; and not just a movie on the big screen. Art imitating life, true life. Be READY….THERE WON’T BE A WARNING SHOT.

BONUS INFO AND VIDEO (MUST SEE/HEAR VIDEO)

Thanks to Dave Hodges for the video. God bless you Dave!

I recently interviewed Paul Martin about the plethora of foreign troops in Colorado. Are they here to perpetuate the continuity of government?

Recently, numbers of Chinese were seen at the Walmart between Loveland and Fort Collins. the significance is explained in the following video.

BONUS INFO LINK: WATER!!!!

Wilderness Survival Skills -7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild

Gifts From the Heart

According to legend, a young man while roaming the desert came across a spring of delicious crystal-clear water. The water was so sweet he filled his leather canteen so he could bring some back to a tribal elder who had been his teacher.

After a four-day journey he presented the water to the old man who took a deep drink, smiled warmly and thanked his student lavishly for the sweet water. The young man returned to his village with a happy heart.

Later, the teacher let another student taste the water. He spat it out, saying it was awful. It apparently had become stale because of the old leather container. The student challenged his teacher: ‘Master, the water was foul. Why did you pretend to like it?’

The teacher replied, ‘You only tasted the water. I tasted the gift. The water was simply the container for an act of loving-kindness and nothing could be sweeter. Heartfelt gifts deserve the return gift of gratitude.’

I think we understand this lesson best when we receive innocent gifts of love from young children. Whether it’s a ceramic tray or a macaroni bracelet, the natural and proper response is appreciation and expressed thankfulness because we love the idea within the gift.

Gratitude doesn’t always come naturally. Unfortunately, most children and many adults value only the thing given rather than the feeling embodied in it.

We should remind ourselves and teach our children about the beauty and purity of feelings and expressions of gratitude. After all, gifts from the heart are really gifts of the heart.

BONUS VIDEO BELOW

Survival Kit For Your Home

Super thanks to Survival Lilly for this video! Thanks Lilly

Future Provisions

*Survival knowledge

One of the main reasons for studying how people survive, whether economically or physically, is to find lessons we can apply to our own lives and circumstances. For many years, economists have been predicting an economic collapse here in America. If you are one of the 93+ million Americans who are out of work, your own personal economy has already collapsed.

Now it’s time to consider how you will earn money, whether you are currently out of work. In the days of the Great Depression, it was common for grocers and landlords to provide credit to their customers. Today? That would be a rare occurrence.

Our ancestors would be sad to see their children (us) toiling over these uncertain times. This was suppose to be a land of freedom and a new start. What happened?

From the Depression, there is an abundance of stories of neighbors and church families showing up at the door, laden with bags and boxes of food for a needy family(this act of kindness now is becoming illegal in many cities). When a desperate mom was asked by her child, “Mama, what’s for dinner tonight?”, the response was, “Whatever the neighbors decide to bring us!” I wish I could imagine that happening today, but our communities and families have become so fractured over the past few decades it would be a rare event.

Perhaps the most impressive thing about the Great Depression is the ingenuity of the Americans who lived through those tough times. Many continued to find ways to earn money, even when their own circumstances were dire.

To earn money, people made homemade fudge, pies and bread and sold them. Eggs could be sold for 25 cents a dozen. If a family lived near water, they could catch and sell fish, clams and crabs(this act too is becoming more and more strict). Some families grew, picked, and sold homegrown produce, and some even started lunch truck wagons (regulation of growers are also under attack).

You could also earn money selling newspapers on the corner(almost a thing of the past). Kids earned a little extra if they were promoted to “Corner Captain”, a sort of Great Depression multi-level marketing program where a kid brought in other kids to sell papers and earned a bit extra himself(no loitering now!). Odd jobs were also a popular way of making money, washing windows, loading coal, even sewing and altering clothes(days of money under the table are wearing thin).

In every case, it was a simple matter of looking around to see what people needed, what they wanted, what made them feel good about themselves and about life.

So, what skills do you have that might offer a service during a severe economic downturn? What knowledge do you have that would be helpful, even vital, to others? What products can you produce? What skills can you teach?

Ingenuity is something which can never be stolen by thieves, confiscated by a government, or lost to flood or fire. It is possible to survive during even a newer Great Depression and there is plenty to learn from those who lived through the last one.

Find a book, read, use the internet, take notes, watch videos from people who know, from those who’ve done it. Knowledge is a good thing if used to help others. And there are plenty out there who need help.

We are all in this (and will be in the future) together; let’s help one another keep going when the SHTF!

*Thanks in more part to :Frank M.

 

Being in the Cement Mixer

Did you ever have a day like this? A man, cleaning one of those big cement trucks, got caught in the mixer. He climbed into the back of the truck with a hose to flush out remaining cement when his hose caught on a lever and pulled it to the ‘on’ position. Suddenly, he found himself going round and round in the mixer with no way to escape. Slipping, sliding and banging around inside, all he could do was shout for help.

Fortunately, another worker came over and shut it off. In moments a bruised man, covered with wet concrete, emerged from the mixer. It reminds me of some days I’ve had. You know what I mean.

If you ever feel as if you are being knocked about by life, think about the amazing bird called the Water Ouzel. I can’t imagine this water bird knows what it is to have a bad day. The little creature is often found living next to violent waterfalls and fast-rushing rivers. And however threatening the weather, however cold the water, in snow and rain and even blazing summer sun, the tough and cheerful Water Ouzel can be heard chirping and singing. What’s more, while the voices of most song-birds, however melodious in warm weather, fall silent over long winter months, the hearty Water Ouzel sings on through all seasons and every kind of storm. I have to wonder: does this little creature know something I don’t?

It’s as if the bird knows that every violent storm will eventually give way to sunshine; every dark night will finally fade into dawn. And isn’t it true? Even our bleakest and stormiest times do not last forever. Like the poor man buffeted about in the cement mixer, there is almost always an end to the turmoil.

As the incredible humanitarian novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe said . . . ‘When you get in a tight place and everything goes against you, until it seems as if you could not hold on a minute longer, never give up then, for that is just the place and time when the tide will turn.’ I have had that experience more times than I can remember.

Maybe this is one of those days you feel as if you are in the cement mixer. If so, maybe you need to hold on a little longer?

Mt 6:26 “Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they?

Ps 30:5 “……………weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.”

Mt 6:34 “Take therefore no thought for the morrow: for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_dipper – A.K.A =Water Ouzel

 

Clay Vessels

A man was exploring caves by the seashore. In one of the caves he found a canvas bag with a bunch of hardened clay vessels. It was like someone had rolled balls of clay and left them out in the sun to bake.

They didn’t look like much, but they intrigued the man, so he took the bag out of the cave with him. As he strolled along the beach, he would throw the clay balls one at a time out into the ocean as far as he could.

He thought little about it, until he dropped one of the clay balls and it cracked open on a rock. Inside was a beautiful, precious stone!

Excited, the man started breaking open the remaining clay vessels. Each contained a similar treasure. He found thousands of dollars worth of jewels in the 20 or so clay balls he had left. Then it struck him.

He had been on the beach a long time. He had thrown maybe 50 or 60 of the clay balls with their hidden treasure into the ocean waves. Instead of thousands of dollars in treasure, he could have taken home tens of thousands, but he had just thrown it away!

It’s like that with people. We look at someone, maybe even ourselves, and we see the external clay vessel. It doesn’t look like much from the outside. It isn’t always beautiful or sparkling, so we discount it.

We see that person as less important than someone more beautiful or stylish or well known or wealthy. But we have not taken the time to find the treasure hidden inside that person.

There is a treasure in each one of us. If we take the time to get to know that person, then the clay begins to peel away and the brilliant gem begins to shine forth.

May we not come to the end of our lives and find out that we have thrown away a fortune in friendships because the gems were hidden in bits of clay.

The Family Tree is …

*Shared story

My grandpa baited the hook with a worm. He did it slowly, allowing me to watch and learn. He handed the rod to me, held my arms and taught me to cast my line into the blue water. Our bobbers floated together, as we sat on the shore hoping for a bite.

‘I remember when I could sit here and watch the fish swimming in the water.’

He said. ‘Sometimes, they’d jump out and land beside me. I didn’t need a rod and bait back then.’ He was teasing me again. I liked it. The sun warmed us. We sat and talked.

‘We have to be patient.’ he continued. ‘The fish may come or they may not. It doesn’t matter. We’re out in the sun. It’s a beautiful day. If it had rained, we wouldn’t be here. We’re lucky to have the warmth of the sun.’

He leaned back against a tree and sighed. ‘Yes, it’s a great day.’

I watched our bobbers. No fish pulled them under that day. It didn’t matter. I was with granddad. I felt grown up. Just being with him was special.

Later, I sat in the back of the boat and watched as he rowed. His powerful muscles rippled with each pull on the oars. I wanted to be like him when I grew up. He was well liked by everyone. He’d struggled hard all his life for the little he had, but he managed to find time to laugh.

My Grandpa was an amazing man. In the short time we had together, he taught me many things: how to bait a hook, the love of a good laugh, the value of a good friend, respect for my elders, to work hard and to love harder. The list is long.

He didn’t always teach me directly. I pictured him with my mom, when she was a child, teaching and guiding her to maturity. The things he taught her would be passed on to me.

The family tree is a learning tree. The larger, older branches support and guide the new smaller branches. They balance the family structure with their strength. Over time, the branches above grow large, join with other families, and shade the older branches below. The branches above take over their role on the learning tree, supporting the new family members.

Ps 1:3 “And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.

Jn 15:5 “I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing.

Jn 15:6 “If a man abide not in me, he is cast forth as a branch, and is withered; and men gather them, and cast them into the fire, and they are burned.