(Update Included) Nuclear Power Plant Meltdown – 50 Mile Radius (LINKS)

Nuclear Power Plant Meltdown – 50 Mile Radius

“Have you wondered where the safest or safer place would be from a nuclear power plant?

What if there was a disaster leading to a nuclear meltdown?

You better be at least 50 miles from a nuclear power plant, and preferably not in a downwind location based on the prevailing winds (which are typically and generally west to east across the U.S. – with variations thereof)…”

Read More Here > https://modernsurvivalblog.com/retreat-living/50-mile-radius-from-a-nuclear-power-plant/

Other Reading:

North Carolina nuclear power plant declares “unusual event” following storm, “hot shutdown”

https://www.intellihub.com/north-carolina-nuclear-power-plant-declares-unusual-event-following-storm-hot-shutdown/

Emergency declared at Brunswick nuclear power plant in North Carolina… all personnel blocked from entering the facility as “hot shutdown” under way

http://nuclear.news/2018-09-17-emergency-declared-at-brunswick-nuclear-power-plant-in-north-carolina-all-personnel-blocked-from-entering-the-facility-as-hot-shutdown-under-way.html

(Update)

Currently I’m monitoring the conditions at the Brunswick Nuclear Plant in the Wilmington area of North Carolina (my state); as of this moment, we can have a sigh of relief. My Dad has a home in Jacksonville (affected and flooded area) He is currently out of harms way and is keeping in touch with people “in the know” (Ret. Marine Corp. Vet) and my mother’s husband (former Army engineer) is a former nuclear electrical engineer for Duke Energy (Duke Power) McGuire Nuclear plant who stays in contact with “people;” and has worked at several power plants (all his life) on contract in two states. At this time I can report that there is an issue, but apparently not a threat to human life beyond the plant at Brunswick. With this said, if you are near Brunswick or ANY power plant; it would not hurt to MOVE if you can away from the ground zero area (approx 50 U.S. miles) or even further (OUT of State!) if possible.

Please keep detoxed, and consider others who cannot or does not know how to help themselves when it comes to health. We are all in this together, regardless of your political affiliation, etc We do need to bless one another with good info. I do admit, we have dark news out there (fake crap too!) and we must use discernment. Bad news, negative news is a part of life.

We need to get over ourselves, get our heads out of the sand and accept that there are dark things among us. Ignoring a problem will not make it go away, it will just assure us that if it comes at us, our good thoughts won’t make it leave, but assures us of defeat. We have the ability to beat evil….we do! (trust in someone bigger than us) And we need to step up and set a new (but old) standard, so that we can be more of a blessing to those around us. There is a leader within us….this is your time to shine- but do not let your guard down (Trust in God!)….hurricane season IS NOT over, and winter issues are also on the way in many places. Prepare accordingly (heat alternatives, etc)……but be glad, the time and ability for hurricanes to form or receive help to form is wanning down!!! 🙂 (NOTE: more hurricanes could be on the way!)

Nuclear Emergency Declared At Brunswick North Carolina Nuclear Power Plant

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Farmer’s Almanac Prediction: We Are ‘Calling For Teeth-Chattering Cold’ (LINK)

If they are right………here’s your heads up; don’t wait till the last minute, get ready NOW for winter! 😐

The Farmer’s Almanac is predicting a bone-chillingly cold and snowy winter. Managing editor of The Farmer’s Almanac Sandi Duncan said: “We’re actually calling for [a] teeth-chattering cold.”

The Almanac’s famed weather forecast is out and the editors are already busting myths about their prediction. If you’re not a fan of winter, the news is bleak. But you’ll still want to break out the winter hats and boots early this year because Duncan added that the cold will likely hit us sooner than normal this winter. “We’re summarizing it as ‘cold and wet’ and the interesting thing is, it looks like winter might start a little bit early. We have some winter storms predicted early on,” said Duncan according to The Press Herald. 

“According to the calendar spring 2019 starts on March 20th, however, according to our outlook, winter conditions may delay spring for several weeks,” said Duncan. “People refer to us when they’re planning a vacation, planning a wedding, planning any kind of event,” said company president Peter Geiger. And the chances of the Farmer’s Almanac being correct are much better than the chances that they are wrong.

Duncan had some added advice for those who particularly dislike the winter months: “When people think of the almanac, right away you think winter,” Duncan said. “But actually there are 16 months of forecasts. If you don’t like the winter forecast, you should keep looking to the summer forecast.”………..”

READ MORE HERE > http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/farmers-almanac-prediction-we-are-calling-for-teeth-chattering-cold_08272018

What Happened In The Year Without A Summer? (1816)- (LINK)

“The day was April 5th, 1815, before the Industrial Revolution began. The majority of the population were farmers, raising crops to feed themselves and others. But farmers depend on good weather, with abundant rain, sunlight and warmth. This year, they wouldn’t have enough of these key weather elements to ensure a good crop. Food prices would rise and many would go hungry. Thousands would die around the world……….”

Read the rest of the story at the link below:

http://www.askaprepper.com/what-happened-in-the-year-without-a-summer-1816/

The Fire Drill

*Still in the Sherwood Forest……?

January in Sherwood Forest was known as ‘Wolf-Month’ for a very good reason; wolf packs driven by snow or cold to shelter in the woodlands in the same way as the outlaws would become a serious threat; the wolves natural food was scarce at that time and starving animals were known to overcome their natural fear of man and enter nearby villages in an attempt to carry off livestock and on more than a few occasions even small children – grown men and horses passing through Sherwood in the medieval period are recorded as having been attacked by wolves, a wintertime hazard that remained until the 14th Century.

In one medieval example, a wolf leaped out on a horse and rider, bit off a piece of horse-rump and fled into the forest with the reeking piece of flesh before the rider realized what had happened. A small child was carried off from Linby by a wolf in the early 12th Century.

Even an armed man on foot would become a hunted quarry and possibly have to face a desperate and terrifying foe suited to the environment and equipped with deadly weapons designed for face-to-face close-combat.

A wonderful morale-booster, fires frighten animals and give off warmth and light and you can then heat your water and cook your food using it, adding a civilized aspect to living rather than just simply surviving outdoors and is what makes most folk today remember as a comfortable camp under canvas or the stars from a past outdoor experience.

Fire can be made using natural materials and is not as hard to create this way as you think if you simply have a go and practice; an everyday task which would be as natural and easy to a medieval person as tying shoelaces or switching on an electric light would be to a modern city-dweller.

Medieval people often carried flint and steel but could also recognize the correct materials for ‘making fire by rubbing two sticks together’ at a glance. This method generally falls into two categories – the fire plough or the fire drill.

Credit: Jonathan C.

P.S. We have many survival advantages Robin Hood and his Merry Men did not have. They lived before matches and other modern fire starters.

Fortunately, we live in an age when we can start a fire whenever and wherever we want.(VIDEO LINK)

VIDEO LESSON

Fresh Bow Drill (Poplar on Hazel)

*Thanks to Survival Lilly for the vid; Good job Lilly!
Watch, Like, Subscribe to Survival Lilly

 

Outlaws and In-Laws

*More lessons from the days of Robin Hood

An outlaw band sheltering in woodland during Robin Hood’s day would exist almost side-by-side with local villagers and as most medieval outlaws were captured through being betrayed, it would be best to either avoid villagers altogether or at least try and stay on reasonably good terms with them.

To make the local people fear you so much that they would both provide valuable foodstuffs and not betray you to the authorities has been demonstrated enough in the past to be seen as worthless for anything beyond a few days.

The Kings deer the oft-quoted free lunch of Robin Hood and The Merry Men are of course there to be taken if you have the skills or the necessary hunting gear.

However, in addition to meat, bread is also a necessity and does not grow on trees or roam the forest glades and by eating only venison you would become sick and grow weaker on a diet of pure protein.

If you could escape or avoid the Foresters and take deer, a local villager could probably be contacted or found who would readily exchange a piece of meat for a loaf of bread, a basket of vegetables or a jug of ale.

The penalties for both if caught poaching were extremely severe in some cases amputation of fingers or hands, branding and blinding or a fine so heavy it would financially crush a man or his village for years.

Lurking outlaws themselves may have also once lived in the same village, and have relatives or friends there to help them survive and were not criminals or bad men.

The law forbade anyone to give aid, help and food to outlaws, who could be taken dead or alive by anyone for a guaranteed cash reward.

For the out-laws to move back in with the in-laws in hard times or bad weather would make good sense ; travel and news became very hard in Sherwood Forest in winter and some places would at times be simply unreachable through snow or mud, with roads and tracks simply disappearing for weeks in the rain or under snow and ice (March was known in Sherwood Forest as Mud-Month where roads and tracks became impassable for long periods ; a problem that remained in Sherwood Forest into the mid 18th Century).

If at these times you couldn’t get out of the village it meant that a threat in the form of officialdom couldn’t get in and for a time a resident outlaw amongst friends might have relative peace, a roof over his head, hot food and a welcome change of company in the form of fresh faces.

Credit: Jonathan C.

*Thanks Jonathan; people are getting info and blessed. It makes sense to tell it like it is; NO MATTER WHAT!

Crayon Candle – Zombie Survival Tips #21

Thanks to my friend and brother @CRAZY RUSSIAN HACKER 

VISIT, WATCH, LIKE, SUBSCRIBE!!!

Some More Lessons To Learn

…albeit the hard way.

In a struggle where more than 650,000 men perished over a period of a mere four years, on a fascinating stage where the last vestiges of feudalism clashed with the industrial revolution and modern representative democracy, there are bound to be lessons.

Latest estimates put the tally at around 800,000 deaths caused by the war. A staggering figure given that the US at the time -1860- had only around 31 million inhabitants all together. Percentage wise this is more than France or Germany lost during the First World War.

If so many people were willing to risk their lives in the most destructive of circumstances, for reasons which are not always clear to us today, this war must have seen some fierce characters. Some rose to the occasion and others faltered miserably.

What are some lessons we can derive from these examples?

First, we’ve learned a true leader takes the blame. One of the most inspirational leaders of the American Civil War was no doubt Robert E. Lee. He won a string of victories against opponents that often outnumbered him by two to one and had superior weaponry and logistics. He was not the most brilliant strategist however and his victories were costly. His management of the war’s biggest and most famous battle, Gettysburg, was very poor and based on deep feelings of contempt for the fighting qualities of his enemy; either that or there was some unified agreed upon collusion with the enemy.

When Lee’s last attempt to win the battle -a grand charge over an open field where his men would be exposed to unlimited fire from well-positioned, long-range Union artillery- was bloodily repulsed, he immediately took all the blame; and justly so.

From the approximately 15,000 men that were assigned to make the charge, about half were lost.

He did not make the best decisions during this battle, but it’s equally true several of his key subordinates made vital mistakes as well. Instead of putting all the blame on them, he took full responsibility for the bloody defeat; again, justly so.

This act held the army together for whatever reason, it had a paradoxical effect of maintaining the confidence of the soldiers had in him, and it inspired the army to fight another day.

Anyway, remember, if you go around blaming other people for what went wrong, they will subconsciously realize you are not really in charge and your authority will suffer. If you want to be a leader, take full responsibility for whatever happens to your cause, army, company, business, community…

Another lesson we can draw is that you decide when you are defeated.

Early in the war general Nathan Bedford Forrest and his men were being -sort of- besieged in Fort Donelson, together with about 14,000 other soldiers. His commanders quickly lost all hope, ignoring opportunities to break out and defeat their enemy. Instead they started bickering over who should take care of the details of their surrender.

Nathan Bedford Forrest understood the situation better than his superiors and took matters into his own hands. He decided to at least keep his own little command out of the enemy’s prisons. He told his men: “Boys, these people are talking about surrendering, and I am going out of this place before they do or bust hell wide open.” He took 700 men and somehow managed to slip them past the enemy’s lines, something his demoralized superiors weren’t even willing to consider. Live today, fight tomorrow scenario.

The lesson: you’re not defeated until you give up looking for opportunities to turn the tide.

Credit mostly: Frank M.

*Thanks Frank!

BONUS VIDEO- CHECK IT OUT!

SHTF Bug Out Bag (Cold Environment)

Thanks to Survival Lilly @ YOUTUBE

Another Chance

How many times gave we wished for another chance to make a fresh beginning.

Another chance to blot out our mistakes and change failure into winning.

It does not take a new day to make a brand new start,
it only takes a deep desire within our heart.

To live and walk in better morals and better choices, to always be forgiving and to add a little sunshine to the dark world in which we’re living.

Don’t give up in despair and think that you are through,
for there’s always a tomorrow and the hope of starting new.

Salvation is still within reach. [LINK] (At Bottom of that page- “click or tap” Make Your Reservations)

Is 55:7 “Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the LORD, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.

Hos 6:1 “Come, and let us return unto the LORD: for he hath torn, and he will heal us; he hath smitten, and he will bind us up.”

Now this is an adventure!

 

Winter Overnight At The Bug Out Camp

Many thanks to Survival Lilly. Thanks Lilly!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!